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Titsup Apple app dev nerve-centre hauled back online after hack scare

Cupertino bungs month of free access onto subs for weeks-long outage

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Apple has revived its online base for app developers a month after the plug was pulled over a "security intrusion".

The developer.apple.com site was taken down on 18 July, just hours after a London-based bloke claimed he had exploited vulnerabilities in the website to prove it was riddled with flaws.

Apple started resurrecting services after a week, but has now reinstated the full site, which has resources for creating software for the fruity firm's gear; it also has documentation on iOS 7 for iPhones, iPods and iPads, and Mavericks, the latest iterations of Mac OS X.

The tech titan has added a month of free access to developers' subscriptions as an olive branch.

"We understand that the downtime was significant, and apologise for any issues it may have caused in your app development," Apple said in an email to programmers. "To help offset this disruption, we are extending the membership of all developer teams by one month."

A Turkish security bod calling himself Ibrahim Balic said that he triggered the outage. He claimed he told Apple he had found 13 security vulnerabilities, which gave him access to more than 100,000 coders' account data, and revealed some records in an attempt to back up his claims.

But The Guardian notes it was unable to contact any of the 29-odd developers whose information was apparently leaked. ®

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

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