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Think your smutty Snapchats can't be saved by dorks? THINK AGAIN

Snapchat Save app promises hassle-free image and video capture

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Sexting has become even more inadvisable following the launch of an app which can surreptitiously store images sent using the self-destructing photo service Snapchat.

Anyone looking to broadcast pictures of their naughty bits was given a boost when Snapchat first launched, because it purported to destroy images a few moments after they were viewed.

But a new app called Snap Save has removed the very raison d'être of Snapchat by allowing users to save images.

Up until now, it was possible for the average Joe (or Josephine) to take a screenshot of pictures or video sent via Snapchat, but the popular sexting app automatically notifies the sender if that happens.

Snap Save promises that "other users will never know you saved the message", raising the possibility that an impetuously-sent sext could be stored, distributed and then hang around on the internet forever.

Snap Save has met with a critical response.

On the iTunes store, a reviewer wrote: "Defeats the purpose of snapchat, shouldn't be allowed on store imo."[sic]

On Twitter, another angry Snapchatter wrote:

If you download Snap Save, just log into Snapchat and you will be given the option of backing up unwatched messages. It supports both video and images.

In a press release, the app's designers, Bit Hax, said: "Snap Save is specially designed for Snapchat. It lets you save all your photos and videos from Snapchat so that you can keep them forever. With it, you will never have to worry about missing a wonderful moment. Snap save supports both videos and photos."

The firm added: "Unlike when taking a screenshot from Snapchat itself, the other user is never notified that you saved their photo/video. An additional feature is that received Snaps are viewable even after you have cleared them from the Snapchat message list.

"Snap Save is a must have app if you are a Snapchat user. You will never have to regret not being able to save a photo or video again."

Are you worried that your sexts could be saved for posterity? Let us know (with words, rather than images please) in the comments via the button below. ®

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