Feeds

The O2 4G Lottery: Are YOU in one of the three LUCKY cities?

But you'll need a new phone, SIM for network's breakneck mobe broadband

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

O2's 4G network will go live in London, Leeds and Bradford this month - followed by ten more cities by the end of the year. The rollout will end EE's virtual monopoly on high-speed mobile internet connectivity.

O2 customers will need a new SIM and a handset compatible with the 800MHz radio band that O2 bought in the last frequency spectrum auction. The service will cost at least £26 a month, but we don't as yet know how much data allowance that will cover – so it's hard to see if it's good value.

The 18 supported smartphones provide no surprises; the iPhone 5 is notable its absence as even its European incarnation only supports the 1.8GHz band, which remains the exclusive preserve of EE. Until October, that is, which is when Three gets a small slice of those airwaves.

By then there'll be a new iPhone (or two, perhaps), and O2's CEO Ronan Dunne was on the wireless this morning declaring that he'd be "amazed" if whatever emerges from Apple in the autumn doesn't support at least the 800MHz band.

iPhone 5 fanbois who really want the 4G experience, and don't want to switch to EE, can take advantage of O2's Phone Promise programme to swap their handset - but they'd be advised to take a careful look at the numbers, as it's not the simple transaction one might imagine.

Not that anyone is going to jump without knowing what the O2 tariffs will actually cost; the precise details won't come out for another week or two. Similarly, we know that O2 will have some coverage in London, Leeds, Bradford, Birmingham, Newcastle, Glasgow, Liverpool, Nottingham, Leicester, Coventry, Sheffield, Manchester and Edinburgh by the end of 2013.

For the initial rollout, the country's capital city is an obvious choice for 4G, and (if you're wondering) Leeds is particularly well mapped out in terms of radio signal reception.

O2's 4G licence requires them to cover 98 per cent of the UK population by 2017, divided up by region (so 98 per cent of Scots, 98 per cent of the Welsh, etc). The company reckons it will achieve that during 2015, which bodes well for a coverage war pushing decent connectivity into the boondocks.

In the meantime we're given a series of comedy videos to whet the appetite.

The one above would have been a lot better if they'd just stumped up for Eye of The Tiger, as they obviously intended. ®

Intelligent flash storage arrays

More from The Register

next story
Crouching tiger, FAST ASLEEP dragon: Smugglers can't shift iPhone 6s
China's grey market reports 'sluggish' sales of Apple mobe
Sea-Me-We 5 construction starts
New sub cable to go live 2016
TEEN RAMPAGE: Kids in iPhone 6 'Will it bend' YouTube 'prank'
iPhones bent in Norwich? As if the place wasn't weird enough
EE coughs to BROKEN data usage metrics BLUNDER that short-changes customers
Carrier apologises for 'inflated' measurements cockup
Comcast: Help, help, FCC. Netflix and pals are EXTORTIONISTS
The others guys are being mean so therefore ... monopoly all good, yeah?
Surprise: if you work from home you need the Internet
Buffer-rage sends Aussies out to experience road rage
EE buys 58 Phones 4u stores for £2.5m after picking over carcass
Operator says it will safeguard 359 jobs, plans lick of paint
prev story

Whitepapers

A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.