Feeds

Sony and Panasonic plan 300GB Blu-Ray replacement for 2015

Will anyone bother with a standards war?

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

Sony and Panasonic have announced a partnership to develop a new format of optical storage disc for data archiving to replace Blu-Ray, and plan to get a 300GB disc in the market by the end of 2015.

In a canned statement the two companies said they had "a proven track record in developing Blu-ray Disc format technologies, and by actively promoting the adoption of a new standard for next-generation high-capacity optical discs, they intend to offer solutions that preserve valuable data for future generations."

That translates to "we rule the roost for the moment and may as well set the standard now before anyone else does."

The dynamic duo plans to sell the discs to the archiving industry in cartridges for automated storage and retrieval of data that's not needed very often but too important to delete. The two companies touted the water and dust-resistant qualities of optical as reliable form of long-term storage as a key selling point.

While the two didn't say anything about commercial media players in the press release, the format would go some way to alleviate the data glut of proposed 4K resolution media which dazzled at CES this year. Both Panasonic and Sony demoed 56-inch OLED UHDTVs at the show, and Blu-Ray ain't going to cut it.

The first 4K film, the 52-minute Timescapes, directed by Tom Lowe, weighs in at 160GB of data for its full cinematic munificence, and you can't buy a full-res Blu-Ray version. No doubt Peter Jackson and Michael Bay would be excited about being able to cram 300GB-worth of CGI wizardry on a suitably capacious format.

The announcement comes a little over five years after the Sony Blu-Ray format semi-officially won out over the rival HD DVD system. The battle for control of the DVD successor took years before it was settled, and the format war cost consumers and manufacturers millions in written-off kit.

This time around it's less likely that anyone will bother to challenge the format that Sony and Panasonic develop. Unless someone can come up with a low-cost alternative that's radically better, the two should have the market position to set the standard. ®

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

More from The Register

next story
Docker's app containers are coming to Windows Server, says Microsoft
MS chases app deployment speeds already enjoyed by Linux devs
Intel, Cisco and co reveal PLANS to keep tabs on WORLD'S MACHINES
Connecting everything to everything... Er, good idea?
SDI wars: WTF is software defined infrastructure?
This time we play for ALL the marbles
'Urika': Cray unveils new 1,500-core big data crunching monster
6TB of DRAM, 38TB of SSD flash and 120TB of disk storage
Facebook slurps 'paste sites' for STOLEN passwords, sprinkles on hash and salt
Zuck's ad empire DOESN'T see details in plain text. Phew!
Windows 10: Forget Cloudobile, put Security and Privacy First
But - dammit - It would be insane to say 'don't collect, because NSA'
Oracle hires former SAP exec for cloudy push
'We know Larry said cloud was gibberish, and insane, and idiotic, but...'
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Win a year’s supply of chocolate
There is no techie angle to this competition so we're not going to pretend there is, but everyone loves chocolate so who cares.
Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Saudi Petroleum chooses Tegile storage solution
A storage solution that addresses company growth and performance for business-critical applications of caseware archive and search along with other key operational systems.