Feeds

Wikileaker Bradley Manning's court martial verdict expected today

Army private faces life in prison for 'aiding the enemy'

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

A military judge will deliver her verdict on Private Bradley Manning's disclosure of secret Army documents to whistleblowing site Wikileaks later today.

Colonel Denise Lind will issue the verdict of the court martial at 1pm EDT (6pm BST) today, following two months of hearing evidence.

Manning has already pleaded guilty to ten lesser charges out of the 22 he faces, but could still go to prison for life on the remaining charges, which include aiding the enemy, transmitting defence information and violations of computer regulations.

The army analyst's defence lawyer, David Coombs, has argued that Manning was "young, naive and good-intentioned" and leaked over 250,000 classified documents to spark public debate about US military and foreign policy, after disillusionment during his deployment in Iraq in 2009.

"I believe that if the general public... had access to the information... this could spark a domestic debate as to the role of the military and foreign policy in general," Manning said in a long statement at the start of his court martial.

"I felt I accomplished something that would allow me to have a clear conscience," he added.

But the prosecution team, headed by Major Ashden Fein, has said that Manning should have known, as an intelligence analyst, that the leaked files could be used by enemy organisations like Al Qaeda, and has accused him of harming national security and endangering people's lives.

"This is a case about a soldier who systematically harvested hundreds of thousands of documents from classified databases and then dumped that information onto the internet into the hands of the enemy," Captain Joe Morrow, one of the prosecuting officers, said at the start of the court martial.

Manning's court martial and treatment since he was arrested have sparked controversy and his actions have divided opinion. While nearly 100,000 people have signed a petition calling for him to be awarded the Nobel Peace Prize, the US government insists that releasing the classified documents could have put the lives of Americans, foreign intelligence and diplomatic sources at risk. ®

Remote control for virtualized desktops

More from The Register

next story
You really need to do some tech support for Aunty Agnes
Free anti-virus software, expires, stops updating and p0wns the world
Regin: The super-spyware the security industry has been silent about
NSA fingered as likely source of complex malware family
You stupid BRICK! PCs running Avast AV can't handle Windows fixes
Fix issued, fingers pointed, forums in flames
Privacy bods offer GOV SPY VICTIMS a FREE SPYWARE SNIFFER
Looks for gov malware that evades most antivirus
Patch NOW! Microsoft slings emergency bug fix at Windows admins
Vulnerability promotes lusers to domain overlords ... oops
HACKERS can DELETE SURVEILLANCE DVRS remotely – report
Hikvision devices wide open to hacking, claim securobods
prev story

Whitepapers

Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
Getting started with customer-focused identity management
Learn why identity is a fundamental requirement to digital growth, and how without it there is no way to identify and engage customers in a meaningful way.
Go beyond APM with real-time IT operations analytics
How IT operations teams can harness the wealth of wire data already flowing through their environment for real-time operational intelligence.
Why CIOs should rethink endpoint data protection in the age of mobility
Assessing trends in data protection, specifically with respect to mobile devices, BYOD, and remote employees.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.