Feeds

Kiwis rally against 'snoops' charter' law

PM Key calls protesters 'misinformed' and 'politically aligned'

Boost IT visibility and business value

New Zealanders have mobilised against the country's “spooks' charter”, the Government Communications Security Bureau (GCSB) bill that's been criticised for legitimising formerly-illegal snooping on NZ residents.

Last week, The Register reported that a deal between the country's minority government and Peter Dunne made it nearly certain that the bill would pass parliament. However, Kiwis are taking exception to the legislation. Over the weekend, protest rallies attracted thousands to 11 locations around the country.

Speaking at the steps of parliament at the Wellington protest, Greens Party co-leader Dr Russel Norman suggested that those attending the rallies could conduct a freedom of information denial-of-service attack on the GCSB. According to the Otago Daily Times, Norman suggested that everyone should file OIA (Official Information Act) requests with the spy agency asking how many people attended the rallies nationwide.

“Maybe if they're so tied up dealing with 10s of thousands of OIA requests, it might give them less time to go around spying on us with their special powers,” he reportedly said.

The New Zealand Herald reports that more than 2,000 attended the anti-GCSB rally in Auckland, and 500 attended in Wellington.

Prime minister John Key dismissed the protests as small, saying that protesters are either “politically aligned” or “misinformed”.

The controversial legislation was introduced after the arrest of Kim Dotcom and fellow operators of the Megadownload Website in 2012 led to the discovery that the GCSB had intercepted his communications. This turned out to be illegal, since at the time Dotcom was a New Zealand resident.

The subsequent investigation revealed that the spy agency had worked with other agencies to spy on New Zealand citizens 88 times since 2003. The proposed laws would legalise the GCSB's domestic activities. ®

Build a business case: developing custom apps

More from The Register

next story
Just TWO climate committee MPs contradict IPCC: The two with SCIENCE degrees
'Greenhouse effect is real, but as for the rest of it ...'
'Blow it up': Plods pop round for chat with Commonwealth Games tweeter
You'd better not be talking about the council's housing plans
Arrr: Freetard-bothering Digital Economy Act tied up, thrown in the hold
Ministry of Fun confirms: Yes, we're busy doing nothing
Help yourself to anyone's photos FOR FREE, suggests UK.gov
Copyright law reforms will keep m'learned friends busy
Apple smacked with privacy sueball over Location Services
Class action launched on behalf of 100 million iPhone owners
Adam Afriyie MP: Smart meters are NOT so smart
Mega-costly gas 'n' 'leccy totting-up tech not worth it - Tory MP
Yes, Australia's government SHOULD store comms metadata
Not because it's a good idea but because it already operates the infrastructure and processes to do it well
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
The Essential Guide to IT Transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIO's automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise.
Maximize storage efficiency across the enterprise
The HP StoreOnce backup solution offers highly flexible, centrally managed, and highly efficient data protection for any enterprise.