Feeds

Man who pulled gun during chess game surrenders to robot cop

No-nonsense tin lawman pacifies testy intellectual with GRENADES

Reducing the cost and complexity of web vulnerability management

A man who pulled a gun on his opponent during a late-night chess game subsequently surrendered to police following the deployment of a heavily armed enforcement robot.

According to the Seattle Times, a resident in the Washington town of Bellevue had invited a neighbour over for a friendly contest of brainpower across the black-and-white board last week. At first the encounter proceeded sociably enough, but then mine host - perhaps getting the worst of the encounter, or for some other reason ("a few drinks" had been had, apparently) - "pulled a gun".

His opponent understandably elected to forfeit the match and leave the residence at speed, and once safely outside called the police.

This apparently led to a lengthy standoff lasting well into the next day, in which regular meatsack plods - doubtless overawed by the brainy, pistol-packing suspect - failed to get a grip on the situation. Naturally enough, as is traditional nowadays in such situations, they then called in robot assistance.

Of course it's well known that a sufficiently advanced computer has no need to fear even the greatest grandmasters of humanity in a chess game - though in some cases at least, the machines have yet to achieve physical superiority over humans (one unfortunate metal lawman was hurled through a door by an obstreperous offender in Connecticut last year).

Perhaps not caring to trust to its undoubted intellectual superiority or a perhaps less assured margin of physical puissance, the tin cop in this case - rather than challenging the man to a chess game or attempting a mano-a-robo takedown - resorted to superior firepower to subdue its quarry, peppering his stronghold with a salvo of "flash bang" stun bombs and incapacitant gas grenades.

This fusillade of ordnance was apparently sufficient to make the man raise the white flag, and he was duly cuffed by the tin cop's fleshy support team. It can safely be assumed that a celebratory round of doughnuts and battery charging took place afterwards at the station. ®

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
WRISTJOB LOVE BONANZA: justWatch sex app promises blind date hookups
Mankind shuffles into the future, five fingers at a time
Every billionaire needs a PANZER TANK, right? STOP THERE, Paul Allen
Angry Microsoftie hauls auctioneers to court over stalled Pzkw. IV 'deal'
Apple's Mr Havisham: Tim Cook says dead Steve Jobs' office has remained untouched
'I literally think about him every day' says biz baron's old friend
Flaming drone batteries ground commercial flight before takeoff
Passenger had Something To Declare, instead fiddled while plane burned
Cops apologise for leaving EXPLOSIVES in suitcase at airport
'Canine training exercise' SNAFU sees woman take home booming baggage
Oi, London thief. We KNOW what you're doing - our PRECRIME system warned us
Aye, shipmate, it be just like that Minority Report
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Security and trust: The backbone of doing business over the internet
Explores the current state of website security and the contributions Symantec is making to help organizations protect critical data and build trust with customers.