Feeds

Back up all you like - but can you resuscitate your data after a flood?

Trevor Pott learns a salutary lesson in data restoration

The essential guide to IT transformation

When it comes to backups two sayings are worth keeping in mind: "if your data doesn't exist in at least two places, it doesn't exist" and "a backup whose restore process has not been tested is no backup at all”.

There is nothing like a natural disaster affecting one of your live locations to test your procedures.

I have just had to deal with this; let's take a look at how.

Pipe dreams

To have a discussion about backups we need to start with what we are backing up and why.

The client in question has two sites, one in Edmonton and one in Calgary. Each site is serviced by a fibre pipe – theoretically capable of 100Mb in emergencies but throttled below that to meet our ISP agreement.

If we keep the cumulative usage between both sites below 'X'Mbps (measured at the 95th percentile) we can use all the bandwidth we want. No caps, no per-GB billing. It is a nice, predictable cost that we can easily manage.

More critically, in case of "oh no!", uncapping those pipes so that each can use the full 100Mb takes a single command.

Each site receives large quantities of information from customers for use at that specific location. This information is made highly available to deal with hardware failure but is not replicated offsite.

We spec our bandwidth only slightly above what we need to handle inbound data; we could never afford the cost of cloud storage, even if we are sending to one of our own datacentres.

Since we have all this infrastructure in place to meet local needs it seems silly not to host our public-facing websites and IT services on our own infrastructure. We have private clouds at each location, gobs of storage, UPSs and a fat pipe. It isn't exactly Amazon, but it should be workable.

Replicate, replicate

None of the databases for our public websites can be set up for live replication because that would require rewriting code to accommodate it. For various reasons that won’t happen any time soon.

So backups are down to cron jobs running on each MySQL server to create regular database dumps, zip, encrypt and then fire them off to our file server.

At the same time the codebase for each web server undergoes a similar backup. The file servers in question are Windows systems running distributed file system replication (DFSR), which does a marvellous job of replicating the backups.

Each site has two identical file servers in a cluster and they both have a copy of the files. The files are then fired across the WAN to the other site where it lives on a pair on that site's file server cluster as well. At this point, I'd say we are pretty well immune to hardware failure.

A backup server at the head office runs a truly archaic version of Retrospect that creates versioned backups to protect against Oopsie Mcfumblefingers, malware or other such issues that might delete the backups in the DFSR share. So anything that is placed in the backups directory on either site is automatically replicated to two systems per site and versioned.

Potential personally identifiable information is encrypted – both in the database and in the rarballs (files that  have been compressed or packaged using rar compression)  – and none of it leaves corporate control.

So far, so good; better solutions certainly exist, but with no budget I think it gets the job done.

Boost IT visibility and business value

Next page: Frying tonight

More from The Register

next story
Pay to play: The hidden cost of software defined everything
Enter credit card details if you want that system you bought to actually be useful
Shoot-em-up: Sony Online Entertainment hit by 'large scale DDoS attack'
Games disrupted as firm struggles to control network
HP busts out new ProLiant Gen9 servers
Think those are cool? Wait till you get a load of our racks
Silicon Valley jolted by magnitude 6.1 quake – its biggest in 25 years
Did the earth move for you at VMworld – oh, OK. It just did. A lot
VMware's high-wire balancing act: EVO might drag us ALL down
Get it right, EMC, or there'll be STORAGE CIVIL WAR. Mark my words
Forrester says it's time to give up on physical storage arrays
The physical/virtual storage tipping point may just have arrived
prev story

Whitepapers

Top 10 endpoint backup mistakes
Avoid the ten endpoint backup mistakes to ensure that your critical corporate data is protected and end user productivity is improved.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Backing up distributed data
Eliminating the redundant use of bandwidth and storage capacity and application consolidation in the modern data center.
The essential guide to IT transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIOs automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.