Feeds

Middle America pulls up sagging pants menace, belts repeat offenders

Low-slung kecks 'totally offensive', thunders Wisconsin politico

High performance access to file storage

It's evident that despite the best attempts of Middle America to crack down on sagging pants - da yoof's low-slung kecks look that has right-minded citizens firing up the Twat-O-Tron - the US way of life continues to be menaced by trousers flying at half mast.

Back in 2007, the Louisiana town of Delcambre took up cudgels against the outrage when it declared the inadequately hitched would face fines or possibly jail for "indecent exposure".

In 2010, a Memphis man popped a cap in the ass of a passing youth whose hip dress sense offended his fashion sensibilities, while Fort Worth's Transportation Authority showed a tad more restraint in 2011 when it simply banned low riders from boarding its buses.

A couple of years back, a University of New Mexico football player found himself on the wrong end of a cuffing when he declined to pull up his trousers after boarding a US Airways flight with pants "so low that his genitals were almost showing".

Now, this very week, Green Bay alderman Dave Boyce has proposed a ban on sagging pants on the grounds they make the Wisconsin city "look bad". He thundered: "There is a sense of outrage, and it's just demeaning to see people walking around like that. It's offensive. It's totally offensive."

Unfortunately for boiling-blood Boyce, Green Bay's legal operatives have warned him the ban "might be a hard ordinance to enforce". Joe Public agrees, and one Virginia Beaton, "visiting with her husband Norm, from Illinois" told a FOX 11 reporter: "I can understand it like in a restaurant or something like that. But people walking around, they have a right to wear what they want. What can you do?"

Boyce also faces objections that his proposal is racially motivated - a charge once levelled at Delcambre mayor Carol Broussard in 2007. But he dismissed that claim, insisting: "White people wear sagging pants, too."

Boyce agrees, adding: "When you go on Google, and you see pictures of Justin Bieber, everybody likes to sport these things with their belt below their groin."

Whether the good burghers of Green Bay are spared the sight of half-masters remains to be seen, but FOX 11 notes they're no longer welcome in the the New Jersey beach town of Wildwood, which earlier this month joined the crusade and outlawed saggies, with fines starting at $25 and rising "as high as $200 for repeat offenders". ®

High performance access to file storage

More from The Register

next story
Forget the beach 'n' boardwalk, check out the Santa Cruz STEVE JOBS FOUNTAIN
Reg reader snaps shot of touching tribute to Apple icon
Happy 40th Playmobil: Reg looks back at small, rude world of our favourite tiny toys
Little men straddle LOHAN, attend tiny G20 Summit... ah, sweet memories...
Oz bank in comedy Heartbleed blog FAIL
Bank: 'We are now safely patched.' Customers: 'You were using OpenSSL?'
Lego is the TOOL OF SATAN, thunders Polish priest
New minifigs like Monster Fighters are turning kids to the dark side
Dark SITH LORD 'Darth Vader' joins battle to rule, er, Ukraine
Only I can 'make an empire out of a republic' intones presidential candidate
Chinese company counters pollution by importing fresh air
Citizens line up for bags of that sweet, sweet mountain air
Google asks April Fools: Want a job? Be our 'Pokemon Master'
Mountain View is prankin' like it's 1999...
prev story

Whitepapers

Mainstay ROI - Does application security pay?
In this whitepaper learn how you and your enterprise might benefit from better software security.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Mobile application security study
Download this report to see the alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, as well as the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.