Feeds

Google accounts for quarter of US internet traffic – report

Global caching network swallows PCs and mobiles

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

Data to and from Google's servers now accounts for a quarter of all US internet traffic, according to the latest network analysis by monitoring firm DeepField, with over 60 per cent of all end users and their devices having some business with the Chocolate Factory every day.

"While it is old news that Google is BIG, the sheer scale and dominance of Google in the Internet infrastructure has significant implications on network design and evolution," said DeepField founder Craig Labovitz in a blog post.

In 2010, back when Labovitz was at doing a similar study for Arbor networks, Google accounted for just 6 per cent of internet traffic, which was big, but still behind the largest ISP. In three years, the Chocolate Factory has expanded its reach dramatically, and Labovitz said the figures understate Google's bigger network share in PC and mobile data.

Google's position isn't just down to basic internet traffic, Labovitz said. Mountain View's analytics, hosting, and advertising services are used by over half of US websites and services, all of which adds to "Google’s growing and pervasive dominance."

The Chocolate Factory is not the biggest bandwidth hog; that prize goes to Netflix, the report found. Traffic from the video-streaming service peaks at US prime time and during cache-update periods, but in terms of overall network traffic, Google could now be considered bigger than Netflix, Twitter, and Facebook combined, he said.

Google's share of US internet traffic

Relentless rise shows few signs of stopping

So what's changed in the last three years? Well, YouTube accounts for a very significant chunk of Google's network traffic in a way similar to Netflix. But Labovitz suggests that Google's rollout of smaller servers to internet service providers, its Google Global Cache (GGC) system, helps account for a lot of the rise.

The GGC servers cache a continuously updated collection of Google's most popular content, and are placed with over half of ISPs in the US, as well as in European and South American networks. This speeds access time, but Labovitz notes the Chocolate Factory is also slapping up data centers at a high rate to feed this edge demand.

What matters, of course, is that Google can turn this traffic into money at a faster rate than its network costs. In last week's financial results, the company reported healthy profits, but also a rise in capital expenditure to $1.6bn and falling cost-per-click revenues. ®

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

More from The Register

next story
Of COURSE Stephen Elop's to blame for Nokia woes, says author
'Google did have some unique propositions for Nokia'
FCC, Google cast eye over millimetre wireless
The smaller the wave, the bigger 5G's chances of success
It's even GRIMMER up North after MEGA SKY BROADBAND OUTAGE
By 'eck! Eccles cake production thrown into jeopardy
Mobile coverage on trains really is pants
You thought it was just *insert your provider here*, but now we have numbers
Don't mess with Texas ('cos it's getting Google Fiber and you're not)
A bit late, but company says 1Gbps Austin network almost ready to compete with AT&T
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.