Feeds

Submarine cable capacity doubled with flick of switch

NTT's Japan-US link now at 8.4 Tbps as Alca-Lu demos 31 Tbps link

3 Big data security analytics techniques

With a flick of a switch, NTT has boosted the capacity on its Japan-US PC-1 cable link more than 2.5 times to 8.4 terabits per second.

The company's announcement heralds the beginning of a rollout that will ultimately take in NTT's intra-Asian submarine cables. NTT has been trialling 100 Gbps digital coherent optical systems from Infinera since 2011, but says only now has it resolved all the technical challenges in achieving stable channels.

“By optically optimising the PC-1’s network architecture, including with strategically placed optical repeaters and an enhanced optical fibre layout, NTT Com has now achieved the world’s first commercial deployment of 100 Gbps digital coherent technology on a transpacific route,” NTT said in an announcement.

Now that the transpacific system is live, NTT says it will begin implementing the systems on its Asia Submarine-cable Express system, which links Japan, the Philippines, Hong Kong, Malaysia and Singapore.

Construction of the ASE cable was completed by Fujitsu and NEC in February 2013.

In the meantime, Alcatel-Lucent is touting capacities far beyond those now being implemented by NTT, successfully demonstrating a 31 Tbps, 7,200 km link, with a repeater spacing of 100 km, in its Villarceaux laboratory near Paris.

Alca-Lu says the 31 Tbps demonstration offers triple the capacity of current advanced submarine cables. To achieve the high data rates, the company ran a DWDM scheme with 155 individual lasers and a channel spacing of 50 GHz, with individual transmissions operating at 200 Gbps.

The experiment was detailed in a post-deadline paper presented at the OECC (Opto-Electronic Communication Conference) earlier this month. ®

SANS - Survey on application security programs

More from The Register

next story
This time it's 'Personal': new Office 365 sub covers just two devices
Redmond also brings Office into Google's back yard
Kingston DataTraveler MicroDuo: Turn your phone into a 72GB beast
USB-usiness in the front, micro-USB party in the back
Dropbox defends fantastically badly timed Condoleezza Rice appointment
'Nothing is going to change with Dr. Rice's appointment,' file sharer promises
Inside the Hekaton: SQL Server 2014's database engine deconstructed
Nadella's database sqares the circle of cheap memory vs speed
BOFH: Oh DO tell us what you think. *CLICK*
$%%&amp Oh dear, we've been cut *CLICK* Well hello *CLICK* You're breaking up...
Just what could be inside Dropbox's new 'Home For Life'?
Biz apps, messaging, photos, email, more storage – sorry, did you think there would be cake?
IT bods: How long does it take YOU to train up on new tech?
I'll leave my arrays to do the hard work, if you don't mind
Amazon reveals its Google-killing 'R3' server instances
A mega-memory instance that never forgets
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a defence for mobile apps
In this whitepaper learn the various considerations for defending mobile applications; from the mobile application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies needed to properly assess mobile applications risk.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.