Feeds

Amazon buffs free platform cloud

Shines up interface and adds VPC support

Security for virtualized datacentres

Amazon has gussied up its Elastic Beanstalk service by polishing the web GUI as it puts pressure on other platform clouds built atop its platform.

The upgrades to Elastic Beanstalk were announced on Wednesday, and see Amazon bring a new user interface into the fiddly management console, and make it possible to run EB instances inside a virtual private cloud environment.

Elastic Beanstalk is a free platform cloud that lives within AWS and handles the deployment, provisioning, load-balancing, auto-scaling, and health monitoring of applications. Since launching in 2011 with support for Java and Apache Tomcat, the service has grown to embrace a multitude of programming languages, including Node.js, PHP, Python, Ruby, and most recently .NET. It competes with platforms from Google (App Engine) and Microsoft (Azure), along with other AWS-hosted apps.

The new console takes in CloudWatch app performance metrics, and allows administrators to set up alerts if traffic exceeds certain predefined thresholds. It has received a facelift that makes it easier to spin up and modify instances through a web-based GUI, though we'd note that most AWS pros are more likely to spend time at the command line than in a browser.

Administrators can now run Elastic Beanstalk instances within Amazon's Virtual Private Cloud environment, following a broader integration of the VPC technology into many of AWS's products as the company tries to sell enterprises on the network isolation gained with VPC.

Admins can also run Elastic Beanstalk in a new environment that limits the underlying resources to a single Amazon instance – useful, Amazon says, for running apps in a test or development environment on the cheap.

Though the changes are iterative, they demonstrate AWS's continued commitment to its platform-as-a-service environment, and should remind companies that sit on top of AWS – Heroku, Engine Yard, and others – that although they offer a standalone product, Amazon continues to put pressure on them. ®

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

More from The Register

next story
It's Big, it's Blue... it's simply FABLESS! IBM's chip-free future
Or why the reversal of globalisation ain't gonna 'appen
IBM storage revenues sink: 'We are disappointed,' says CEO
Time to put the storage biz up for sale?
'Hmm, why CAN'T I run a water pipe through that rack of media servers?'
Leaving Las Vegas for Armenia kludging and Dubai dune bashing
Microsoft and Dell’s cloud in a box: Instant Azure for the data centre
A less painful way to run Microsoft’s private cloud
Facebook slurps 'paste sites' for STOLEN passwords, sprinkles on hash and salt
Zuck's ad empire DOESN'T see details in plain text. Phew!
Windows 10: Forget Cloudobile, put Security and Privacy First
But - dammit - It would be insane to say 'don't collect, because NSA'
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.