Feeds

Google conjures dedicated memcache within platform cloud

App Engine catches up with Amazon and Microsoft's floating silos

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

Google has added a dedicated memcache service to its platform cloud, giving the company's technology more of the characteristics of clouds operated by Amazon and Microsoft.

The upgrades to Google App Engine (GAE) came as part of the 1.8.2 release of the platform cloud, along with Git push-to-deploy for developers that use the popular git code management service, and other updates relating to PHP, Python, and Eclipse support.

Memcache is an open source object caching system that stores key-value data in pooled RAM from multiple servers. It is used by websites including Wikipedia, Twitter, and Craigslist.

Wrapping in features like memcache-as-a-service is crucial for cloud companies that are trying to woo developers into their floating silos. GAE already had a memcache service, but dedicated memcache provides developers guarantees of capacity and performance for $0.12 cents per gigabyte per hour, whereas the previous shared service offered no guarantees at all.

"With dedicated memcache you can purchase in-memory data caching capacity exclusively for your application, cache more data and drive up cache hit rates," Google cloud product manager Chris Ramsdale, wrote in a blog post that announced the changes. "With higher cache hit rates, dedicated memcache can also reduce Datastore costs and make your application faster than ever."

The preview service will compete with similar offerings from Amazon (Amazon ElastiCache), and Microsoft (Windows Azure Caching with memcache protocol support).

Besides Memcache, Google also enabled support for Git code management with Git Push-to-Deploy, which lets developers push App Engine code up into git along with App Engine. The service has also received App Engine Modules, which serve as a way of breaking large applications into modular components that can share services.

Developers can class their apps modules with three types of scaling properties – manual, basic, and automatic – which will affect how the software consumes resources over time according to demand.

Though much of Google's development emphasis appears to be around taking on Amazon via infrastructure-as-a-service with Google Compute Engine, Mountain View has continued to add new features into App Engine, as it seeks to expose more internal Google services to developers. Google had not responded to further queries at the time of writing. ®

Build a business case: developing custom apps

More from The Register

next story
Microsoft: Azure isn't ready for biz-critical apps … yet
Microsoft will move its own IT to the cloud to avoid $200m server bill
Shoot-em-up: Sony Online Entertainment hit by 'large scale DDoS attack'
Games disrupted as firm struggles to control network
Silicon Valley jolted by magnitude 6.1 quake – its biggest in 25 years
Did the earth move for you at VMworld – oh, OK. It just did. A lot
VMware's high-wire balancing act: EVO might drag us ALL down
Get it right, EMC, or there'll be STORAGE CIVIL WAR. Mark my words
Forrester says it's time to give up on physical storage arrays
The physical/virtual storage tipping point may just have arrived
VMware vaporises vCHS hybrid cloud service
AnD yEt mOre cRazy cAps to dEal wIth
prev story

Whitepapers

A new approach to endpoint data protection
What is the best way to ensure comprehensive visibility, management, and control of information on both company-owned and employee-owned devices?
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Maximize storage efficiency across the enterprise
The HP StoreOnce backup solution offers highly flexible, centrally managed, and highly efficient data protection for any enterprise.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.