Feeds

Micron flashes flashy 16-nanometer flash memory

Tiny 128-gigabit chippery for tiny devices – and 'data center cloud storage'

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

Boise, Idaho–based memory maker Micron has announced that it is now sampling 16-nanometer 128-gigabit multi-level cell (MLC) NAND flash memory chips.

Micron 128-gigabit multi-level cell NAND Flash memory device

You can't make storage subsystems any smaller than this – yet

"Our customers continually ask for higher capacities in smaller form factors, and this next-generation process node allows Micron to lead the market in meeting those demands," said Micron NAND Solutions Group VP Glen Hawk in a statement.

The 16nm MLC NAND, which Micron modestly calls "the most advanced processing node for any sampling semiconductor device," is intended for use, the company says, in devices where storage needs to be comparatively capacious and yet the room available for it is constrained.

Specifically, Micron says that the tiny chips are targeted at a relatively large range of devices, such as "consumer SSDs, removable storage (USB drives and Flash cards), tablets, ultrathin devices, mobile handsets and data center cloud storage."

Being at the 16nm node, Micon claims that their 128Gb part offers the highest density and lowest cost of any MLC available. "In fact," the company says, "the new technology could create nearly 6TB of storage on a single wafer."

In addition to now sampling the new device to "select partners" with full production scheduled to begin in the fourth quarter of this year, Micron is also developing its own line of SSDs based on 16nm MLC NAND chips, planning to bring those devices to market sometime next year.

Your aging Reg reporter remembers helping to set up a Tandem computer installation in the 1980s, which included a pair of 350MB hard drives, each of which were just about the same size as a washing machine – and which made about the same amount of noise. Ain't storage-tech progress wunnerful? ®

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

More from The Register

next story
Nexus 7 fandroids tell of salty taste after sucking on Google's Lollipop
Web giant looking into why version 5.0 of Android is crippling older slabs
All aboard the Poo Bus! Ding ding, route Number Two departing
Only another three days of pooing and I can have a ride!
Heyyy! NICE e-bracelet you've got there ... SHAME if someone were to SUBPOENA it
Court pops open cans of worms and whup-ass in Fitbit case
Official: European members prefer to fondle Apple iPads
Only 7 of 50 parliamentarians plump for Samsung Galaxy S
Fujitsu CTO: We'll be 3D-printing tech execs in 15 years
Fleshy techie disses network neutrality, helmet-less motorcyclists
Space Commanders rebel as Elite:Dangerous kills offline mode
Frontier cops an epic kicking in its own forums ahead of December revival
The IT Crowd's internet in a box gets $240k of crowdcash for a cause
'Outernet' project proposes satellite-fuelled 'Lantern' WiFi library for remote areas
prev story

Whitepapers

Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Getting ahead of the compliance curve
Learn about new services that make it easy to discover and manage certificates across the enterprise and how to get ahead of the compliance curve.
Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile
Data demand and the rise of virtualization is challenging IT teams to deliver storage performance, scalability and capacity that can keep up, while maximizing efficiency.