Feeds

Just what is Big Blue now shipping exclusively to the Chinese?

And maybe the rest of the world, if we're lucky

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

IBM is pushing out another China-only mid-range Storwize array, the V5000.

Judging by previous experience, it might eventually be shipped worldwide, but for the time being, IBM is sticking to PROC and ROC*.

Back in August last year, the V3500 was launched for the Chinese geography, with the V3700 coming in two months later, and effectively replacing IBM's long-lived DS3500.

The new array, the V5000, shares the same 2U enclosure as the V3700 and can have either 24 small form factor (SFF) drives (2.5in) or 12 larger (LFF) 3.5in drives. There is a maximum of 168 small form factor or 84 large form factor drives taking up a base unit and six expansion drawers. Using 4TB drives, maximum storage capacity will be 336TB.

Two nodes can be clustered together, taking maximum capacity to 672TB. Both iSCSI (2 x 1GbitE) and Fibre Channel (4 x 8Gbit/s) host connectivity options are supported.

The system supports storage virtualisation for data input with a license required for external storage virtualisation.

We might well expect history to repeat itself with there being a version of the V5000 introduced for the rest of the world in a few months.

The Storwize line now starts at the V3500/V3700 entry-level, passes through the (for now) China-only V5000 to the top-end V7000.

It doesn't seem likely that this new V5000 may affect the positioning of IBM's mid-range DCS3700 array, which has 60 disk drives in a 4U enclosure and Fibre Channel, iSCSI and SAS connectivity.

The maximum drive count is 360 providing in excess of 1PB of capacity using 3TB 3.5-in drives, so it comfortably out-scales the V5000 capacity-wise. Give it 4TB drives and it will out-scale the V5000 even more.

Finally, we at the El Reg storage desk note that IBM's Flash System 820 array, the rebranded TMS 820, is quite old in flash product terms, having been announced in February 2012, with 24TB in a 1U enclosure.

We're beginning to expect an uprated top-end for the line - there's Kaminario's K2 to beat in the IOPS game. ®

* The People's Republic Of China (the mainland and its special administrative regions, Hong Kong and Macau) and the Republic Of China (Taiwan).

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
Ellison: Sparc M7 is Oracle's most important silicon EVER
'Acceleration engines' key to performance, security, Larry says
Oracle SHELLSHOCKER - data titan lists unpatchables
Database kingpin lists 32 products that can't be patched (yet) as GNU fixes second vuln
Lenovo to finish $2.1bn IBM x86 server gobble in October
A lighter snack than expected – but what's a few $100m between friends, eh?
Ello? ello? ello?: Facebook challenger in DDoS KNOCKOUT
Gets back up again after half an hour though
Hey, what's a STORAGE company doing working on Internet-of-Cars?
Boo - it's not a terabyte car, it's just predictive maintenance and that
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.