Feeds

IQ test: 'Artificial intelligence system as smart as a four year-old'

Computing rug rat struggles with common sense

Bridging the IT gap between rising business demands and ageing tools

Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago have applied an IQ test to MIT's ConceptNet 4 artificial intelligence system, and determined it's about as smart as a somewhat-challenged four-year-old child.

The team used the Weschsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence Test on the system and found it performed reasonably well on vocabulary and recognizing similarities, but scored very poorly on comprehension.

"ConceptNet 4 did dramatically worse than average on comprehension - the 'why' questions," said Robert Sloan, professor and head of computer science at UIC, and lead author on the study. "If a child had scores that varied this much, it might be a symptom that something was wrong."

ConceptNet 4 has now been replaced with a smarter AI system, ConceptNet 5, but Sloan said its predecessor's performance highlighted one of the fundamental problems with generating true artificial intelligence. Such systems are have great difficulty generating what humans call common sense, since that all-too-rare capacity requires not only an extensive amount of factual knowledge, but also subjective facts we learn in life.

"All of us know a huge number of things," said Sloan. "As babies, we crawled around and yanked on things and learned that things fall. We yanked on other things and learned that dogs and cats don't appreciate having their tails pulled."

For example, he said it's easy to build a computer that knows the freezing temperature of water, but it also has to know that ice is cold, which is a much more subjective calculation. The team is now feeding the research back into AI development with the hope of creating more efficient software that can complement (or compete with) humans.

"We're still very far from programs with common sense – AI that can answer comprehension questions with the skill of a child of eight," concludes Sloan. ®

Mobile application security vulnerability report

More from The Register

next story
Malaysian Airlines flight MH17 claimed lives of HIV/AIDS cure scientists
Researchers, advocates, health workers among those on shot-down plane
Mwa-ha-ha-ha! Eccentric billionaire Musk gets his PRIVATE SPACEPORT
In the Lone Star State, perhaps appropriately enough
All those new '5G standards'? Here's the science they rely on
Radio professor tells us how wireless will get faster in the real world
The Sun took a day off last week and made NO sunspots
Someone needs to get that lazy star cooking again before things get cold around here
Boffins discuss AI space program at hush-hush IARPA confab
IBM, MIT, plenty of others invited to fill Uncle Sam's spy toolchest, but where's Google?
Microsoft's anti-bug breakthrough: Wire devs to BRAIN SCANNERS
Clippy: It looks your hands are shaking, are you sure you want to commit this code?
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Reducing security risks from open source software
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.