Feeds

Microsoft lathers up Windows 8.0 Surface RT for quick price shave

You don't have to be a student to buy unwanted slab

Security for virtualized datacentres

Microsoft is once again slashing the price of its unwanted ARM-based Surface RT fondleslabs.

The software giant has shaved 30 per cent off the price of a 32GB RT device now $349 and 25 per cent off the 64GB RT, now $449.

A 32GB Surface with a black Touch cover has been cut by 25 per cent to $449 and a 64GB unit with same black Touch cover is reduced by 21 per cent to $549.

Reductions are available through the Microsoft store in the US and through US retailers, Best Buy and Staples. The cuts do not seem to have made it to the UK, however. Intel-based Surface Pros are not being cut.

The price cut marks the second chop in the price of an RT, following June's whopping 60 per cent off for students buying the 32GB version, and cuts of 58 per cent and 54 per cent respectively given off the 32GB machine with Touch cover and RT with Type cover. That offer runs until 31 August in more than 10 countries including the US and UK.

Microsoft has also been throwing the RTs at attendees of its conferences.

Redmond has never said how many RTs were manufactured, but however many it made, it was too many. According to the most reliable and recent figures from market-trackers at IDC, Microsoft shipped just 900,000 Surface RTs and Pros in the first three months of 2013. Apple, by contrast, shifted 19.5 million iPads.

Windows RT was supposed to be Microsoft’s thin and lightweight alternative to the iPad. Problem is, it cannot run existing Windows apps - and there's an obvious lack of new apps.

The RT runs a version of Windows 8 that has been built for the ARM architecture.

The unloved slablet and the Windows 8.0 OS have become emblematic of Microsoft’s struggle to transition into tablets and touch: it is struggling to keep existing desktop and laptop users who need to be convinced to adapt to Microsoft’s tablets and touch operating system as well as to win over a whole new segment of customer which will also need to be convinced of its merits.

Windows 8 was supposed to be a no-compromise operating system that pushed everybody into this new way of working, only it backfired. Windows 8.1 represents a bit of a backpedal with the return of the Start button.

The disconnect between what Microsoft wants to do and is being forced to do has been articulated by chief evangelist Steven Guggenheimer. In an interview here, Microsoft's cheerleader-in-chief predicted the desktop would “go away” over time but added quickly “it will never go away completely.” ®

New hybrid storage solutions

More from The Register

next story
Apple iPhone 6: Missing sapphire glass screen FAIL explained
They just cannae do it in time, says analyst
Slap my Imp up: Bullfrog's Dungeon Keeper
Monsters need to earn a living too
Oh noes, fanbois! iPhone 6 Plus shipments 'DELAYED' in the UK
Is EMBIGGENED Apple mobile REALLY that popular?
Apple's big bang: iPhone 6, ANOTHER iPhone 6 Plus and WATCH OUT
Let's >sigh< see what Cupertino has been up to for the past year
The Apple Watch and CROTCH RUBBING. How are they related?
Plus: 'NostrilTime' wristjob vid action
Apple's SNEAKY plan: COPY ANDROID. Hello iPhone 6, Watch
Sizes, prices and all – but not for the wrist-o-puter
Apple Pay is a tidy payday for Apple with 0.15% cut, sources say
Cupertino slurps 15 cents from every $100 purchase
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile
Data demand and the rise of virtualization is challenging IT teams to deliver storage performance, scalability and capacity that can keep up, while maximizing efficiency.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.