Feeds

Internet overlords deny Google's 'dotless' domains dream

Chocolate Factory's 'http://search' plan may 'harm security of internet'

Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction

The Internet Architecture Board (IAB) has issued a statement in which it all-but-rules-out Google's plan to take over some new top-level domains and offer them in “dotless” configurations that would enable web addresses like “http://search".

Google outlined its plans for .search, .app and cloud back in April. The idea of Google owning or operating the domains earned a frosty reception.

Now the IAB, a a committee of the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) that among other things “ … provides oversight of, and occasional commentary on, aspects of the architecture for the protocols and procedures used by the Internet” has put the kybosh on the idea.

The Board's reasons why are explained here in a statement that says “dotless domains will not work as intended by TLD operators in the vast majority of cases” because the Internet wasn't built to support them.

Such domains can work, the statement says, if organisations configure their own “search lists” to make them possible. That's even a feature of DNS, “ … because most users entering single-label names want them to be resolved in a local context, and they do not expect a single name to refer to a TLD.”

But not everyone does so, which means “dotless domains will not behave consistently across various locations”.

That leads the IAB to suggest “they have the potential to confuse users and erode the stability of the global DNS”. Worse still, dotless domains may hurt internet security. Here's why:

“By attempting to change expected behavior, dotless domains introduce potential security vulnerabilities. These include causing traffic intended for local services to be directed onto the global Internet (and vice-versa), which can enable a number of attacks, including theft of credentials and cookies, cross-site scripting attacks, etc. As a result, the deployment of dotless domains has the potential to cause significant harm to the security of the Internet.”

The Board concludes that it “believes that the current IETF recommendations against the use of dotless domains are important to the continued viability and success of the Internet, and strongly recommends that the Internet community strictly adhere to them.” ®

3 Big data security analytics techniques

More from The Register

next story
This time it's 'Personal': new Office 365 sub covers just two devices
Redmond also brings Office into Google's back yard
Kingston DataTraveler MicroDuo: Turn your phone into a 72GB beast
USB-usiness in the front, micro-USB party in the back
It's GOOD to get RAIN on your upgrade parade: Crucial M550 1TB SSD
Performance tweaks and power savings – what's not to like?
AMD's 'Seattle' 64-bit ARM server chips now sampling, set to launch in late 2014
But they won't appear in SeaMicro Fabric Compute Systems anytime soon
IBM rides nightmarish hardware landscape on OpenPOWER Consortium raft
Google mulls 'third-generation of warehouse-scale computing' on Big Blue's open chips
prev story

Whitepapers

Mobile application security study
Download this report to see the alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, as well as the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.