Feeds

Up yours, Google! Iran to launch OWN state email service

Wants better 'interaction' with its surveillance gear people

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

The Iranian government is set to roll out a national email service to all of its citizens in another ominous step towards the dismantling of their online freedoms.

There’s not much detail on the new home-grown service, which was apparently reported in local media and on state-run TV, except that it will use the “mail.post.ir domain” and will be run by the country’s postal service, according to Reuters.

The newswire quotes communications minister Mohammad Hassan Nami as saying that the service has been designed to enable “mutual interaction and communication between the government and the people”.

There’s no news yet on whether an email address will be mandatory, or if the Islamic republic is planning to completely block all other email services once the government scheme is up and running, although online freedoms have certainly been on the wane there for several years.

There have been rumours dating back to last year, for example, that the authorities are planning to control the surfing habits of Iranians by effectively cutting the country off from the rest of the internet and running a nationwide intranet.

The government has already blocked Gmail and other foreign websites intermittently in the past and even launched its own YouTube-like video sharing site, known as Mehr.

VPN services and social networking sites were also targeted in the run-up to the recent presidential elections, in what some claimed was an attempt to prevent protesters from organising themselves, as happened in 2009.

It remains to be seen whether incoming Iranian president Hassan Rouhani, who is nominally against repressive web filtering and state interference, will effect any serious change once he comes to power.

If Iran does restrict its users to a single government-run email service, malicious messages and spam from the domain will be particularly easy for security vendors to trace. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
Why has the web gone to hell? Market chaos and HUMAN NATURE
Tim Berners-Lee isn't happy, but we should be
Mozilla's 'Tiles' ads debut in new Firefox nightlies
You can try turning them off and on again
Microsoft boots 1,500 dodgy apps from the Windows Store
DEVELOPERS! DEVELOPERS! DEVELOPERS! Naughty, misleading developers!
'Stop dissing Google or quit': OK, I quit, says Code Club co-founder
And now a message from our sponsors: 'STFU or else'
Apple promises to lift Curse of the Drained iPhone 5 Battery
Have you tried turning it off and...? Never mind, here's a replacement
Uber, Lyft and cutting corners: The true face of the Sharing Economy
Casual labour and tired ideas = not really web-tastic
Linux turns 23 and Linus Torvalds celebrates as only he can
No, not with swearing, but by controlling the release cycle
prev story

Whitepapers

Gartner critical capabilities for enterprise endpoint backup
Learn why inSync received the highest overall rating from Druva and is the top choice for the mobile workforce.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Rethinking backup and recovery in the modern data center
Combining intelligence, operational analytics, and automation to enable efficient, data-driven IT organizations using the HP ABR approach.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.