Feeds

US public hate Snowden - but sexpot spy Anna Chapman LOVES him

Deep penetration femme fatale fancies PRISM deepthroat

Securing Web Applications Made Simple and Scalable

The American public is turning against NSA leaker Edward Snowden, with increasing numbers of people now believing he was wrong to reveal details of secret US government surveillance, a survey has found.

But you shouldn't feel too sad for the geeky whistleblower, because sexpot Russian spy Anna Chapman has said she would happily have his babies.

Snowden is still hiding out in a Moscow airport, evading the attentions of US spooks who want to drag him back to the States to face espionage charges.

Yougov has conducted regular polls of public opinion ever since the PRISM story broke, surveying 1,000 people to gauge the mood of the nation. When Snowden first told the world about the NSA's spooky digital surveillance tool, American public opinion was evenly split between those who thought he had done the right thing and those who thought he should be strung up.

Now the Snowden haters are in the ascendancy, with 43 percent of Americans saying they have an unfavourable view of the whistleblower, and 36 percent in favour. On June 17, just after the PRISM story broke, 40 percent agreed with Snowden's actions and 39 percent disagreed.

Increasing numbers of people also want to see him face trial, up to 34 percent from 27 percent just after the first reports about the leak.

Older people are particularly angry at the former IT worker, with 57 percent holding a negative view of him.

But despite being angry about the PRISM leaks, Americans are still nervous about NSA spooks.

Yougov said:

"Despite the changing opinion of Snowden, Americans remain opposed to the NSA’s activities. By 55% to 28%, they say the surveillance was an unnecessary intrusion into American lives. They remain divided on whether the surveillance has prevented terrorist attacks. And they continue to believe that the NSA, despite its claims to the contrary, has listened in on the conversations of Americans."

He may be unpopular at home, but Snowden should take some comfort from a few fruity tweets from the world's sexiest spy, Anna Chapman, who shot to fame for being the only member of a Russian spy ring unmasked in 2010 who was even passably attractive. El Reg's favourite spook was thrown out of America along with nine other Russian agents when she was exposed as deep cover femme fatale who planned to seduce a senator and pump him dry (of secrets).

Since being packed off back to the motherland, she has carved out a career as a lingerie model and even tried to get a gig designing outfits for cosmonauts. Now she's hoping to draw Edward Snowden into her honeypot.

She sent the following tweets last week:

She was then contacted by an account called @NSA, which is a fake account taking the mickey out of the American spooks, to which she replied:

There's no word on what Snowden's poledancing blogger girlfriend Lindsay Mills has to say about Chapman's attempt to steal her man. Your humble reporter recently had the unenviable task of rooting through her blog, which showed her love for turgid prose was matched only by her passion for skimpy outfits.

The page, L's Journey, has now been taken down and its author has gone to ground. Before Snowden disappeared, it featured interminable personal reminiscences written in painfully prolix blogger-ese. Oh, and dozens of images of images of the exhibitionist dancer prancing around in her underwear or simply wearing nothing at all.

The fugitive Snowden is probably not prioritising his romantic affairs at the moment, however, as he seeks to stay out of the clutches of the US government.

Meanwhile in old Blighty, privacy advocates have submitted complaints to the Investigatory Powers Tribunal, the oversight body tasked with making sure that cops, spooks and others do not abuse their powers to conduct surveillance on UK citizens. The campaigners say that Snowden's revelations show that British spooks have cooperated with American ones to evade restrictions on what information they are allowed to collect on their own citizens. ®

The smart choice: opportunity from uncertainty

More from The Register

next story
Yorkshire cops fail to grasp principle behind BT Fon Wi-Fi network
'Prevent people that are passing by to hook up to your network', pleads plod
Major problems beset UK ISP filth filters: But it's OK, nobody uses them
It's almost as though pr0n was actually rather popular
UK government officially adopts Open Document Format
Microsoft insurgency fails, earns snarky remark from UK digital services head
HP, Microsoft prove it again: Big Business doesn't create jobs
SMEs get lip service - what they need is dinner at the Club
ITC: Seagate and LSI can infringe Realtek patents because Realtek isn't in the US
Land of the (get off scot) free, when it's a foreign owner
MPs wave through Blighty's 'EMERGENCY' surveillance laws
Only 49 politcos voted against DRIP bill
Help yourself to anyone's photos FOR FREE, suggests UK.gov
Copyright law reforms will keep m'learned friends busy
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Reducing security risks from open source software
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.