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Every Friday is rat-out-your-boss-for-software-piracy Friday

Even so, most workers tick DILLIGAF* box on survey

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For The Cure, Friday was a day of love, for most of us it is the gateway to the weekend - but for pirate-haters it is the best time to shop employers using unlicensed software at work.

This is the latest statistic from the Ministry of Silly Numbers, aka the Federation Against Software Theft, whose latest research states 34 per cent of whistleblowers choose Fridays to call the piracy police.

The reasons why are unbeknown to FAST, which speculated that although Friday is typically a "more relaxed dress down day" it comes at the end of a potentially stressful week.

"Is it the case that UK workers have just about had enough by then and go into report their employers, or is it that they have more time on their hands to do it?" asked FAST CEO Alex Hilton.

Hilton spent a near 12-year stretch at Microsoft and currently also doubles up as CEO at the Cloud Industry Forum.

The next most popular days to turn informant are Mondays and Wednesdays, with 18 per cent of those surveyed opting for them.

FAST offers no financial incentives to employees who dob in someone who "misuses" software, but despite this wants people to "do the right thing" by coming forward to tip them off.

It is currently running roadshows with local police and Trading Standards in the West Country under the "Stay Legal" programme.

Research that the not-for-profit organisation - made up of independent software vendors, resellers, disties and consultancies – carried out in 2012 showed the extent of the reluctance of workers to rat on their employers.

The survey revealed 68 per cent of the sample said they would NOT report piracy; almost a quarter (24 per cent) were concerned about protecting their job; 10 per cent said they didn't want to be seen as a snitch; and 58 per cent said they just didn't care.

Hilton said FAST may offer compensation if an employer acts illegally when a protected disclosure is coughed. "If you think that software piracy is taking place in your office, then get in touch." ®

* DILLIGAF (happily, not some tech sales team acronym du jour you've never heard of...)

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