Feeds

Samsung: Psst, EU regulator. About that $17.3bn fine... let's talk

Koreans wriggling off hook over Apple injunctions

Website security in corporate America

Samsung is in discussions with the EU about settling charges of anti-competitive behaviour against Apple, in order to slip the potential $17.3bn fine it faces if found guilty.

The news comes from Reuters, which has been chatting to a couple of "people familiar with the matter" and discovered Samsung has opened negotiations rather than fighting the charges head-on.

There would be no admission of guilt, and no possibility of a billion-dollar fine, but it would end one battle in the ongoing war between Samsung and Apple.

The EU has been investigating Samsung's use of injunctions to prevent the sale of certain Apple kit which - according to Samsung - infringes its patents. But those patents are subject to Fair, Reasonable And Non-Discriminatory (FRAND) licensing, so Samsung isn't permitted to deny Apple a licence - or charge Cupertino any more than anyone else.

FRAND is, however, quite woolly when it comes to the details. Exact pricing is confidential and often bundled with other services so it's hard for a company like Apple to prove discriminatory pricing but Samsung obviously feels the EU is close to achieving that.

If Samsung has breached EU rules then it could be in line for a whopping fine: up to $17.3bn according to Reuters. It would probably be much less than that, but still worth avoiding if possible and Samsung will have to offer serious concessions to slip away.

On the other side of the pond, Apple is still fighting to keep its older iPhones and iPads on the shelves following a ban on their import from the International Trade Commission (the US body which controls import and export of goods).

That ban kicks in next week, unless Apple can convince the ITC to change its mind, or the President to intervene on public interest grounds. Apple's latest filing (examined by 21st Century mudlark Florian Mueller, available on Scribd) tries various arguments to achieve that.

Samsung seems to be getting better at its legal battles. It’s certainly getting plenty of practice, but there's still a very long way to go before we'll see any sign of peaceful resolution.

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

More from The Register

next story
Phones 4u slips into administration after EE cuts ties with Brit mobe retailer
More than 5,500 jobs could be axed if rescue mission fails
JINGS! Microsoft Bing called Scots indyref RIGHT!
Redmond sporran metrics get one in the ten ring
Driving with an Apple Watch could land you with a £100 FINE
Bad news for tech-addicted fanbois behind the wheel
Murdoch to Europe: Inflict MORE PAIN on Google, please
'Platform for piracy' must be punished, or it'll kill us in FIVE YEARS
Bono: Apple will sort out monetising music where the labels failed
Remastered so hard it would be difficult or impossible to master it again
Phones 4u website DIES as wounded mobe retailer struggles to stay above water
Founder blames 'ruthless network partners' for implosion
Found inside ISIS terror chap's laptop: CELINE DION tunes
REPORT: Stash of terrorist material found in Syria Dell box
Sony says year's losses will be FOUR TIMES DEEPER than thought
Losses of more than $2 BILLION loom over troubled Japanese corp
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Intelligent flash storage arrays
Tegile Intelligent Storage Arrays with IntelliFlash helps IT boost storage utilization and effciency while delivering unmatched storage savings and performance.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.