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Freed LulzSec hacker banned from contacting Anons, wiping data

Returns to Twitter to plan prison diary, film project

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Erstwhile LulzSec spokesman Jake Davis has been freed from detention, with strict conditions on the 20-year-old's use of the internet and computers.

Davis (aka Topiary), formerly of Lerwick in Shetland, was convicted of computer hacking over his role in the infamous LulzSec hacking crew in May and banged up for 24 months in May at a hearing in London's Southwark Crown Court.

However, time served wearing an electronic tag for 21 months was taken into account as part of this sentence, so that Davis spent just 37 days at Feltham Young Offenders' Institution. Specifically Davis was jailed for "two counts of conspiracy to do an unauthorised act with intent to impair the operation of a computer" involving hack attacks against the UK's Serious and Organised Crime Agency and Sony Pictures. He was found not guilty of two counts of encouraging or assisting offences.

He will be allowed to use the internet following his release, but is prohibited from contacting any of his former LulzSec cohorts or members of the wider Anonymous collective. He's also forbidden from setting up encrypted files or folders, securely wiping any data or deleting his internet history.

Davis told the BBC he plans to publish a prison diary about his experiences. There's even talk of a film.

In the meantime, Davis has returned to the Twitterverse as @DoubleJake, where he has expressed support for Edward Snowden and spoke of his brief time behind bars and future plans.

Despite his time behind bars at Feltham, Davis' sense of humour seems to be strong and unimpaired.

An BBC Newsnight interview with Davis around the time of his sentencing by can be found here. ®

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