Feeds

Angry punters slip contract shackles in T-Mobile crystal ball bill rumpus

Others flung back into mobile dungeon by adjudicators

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

3 Big data security analytics techniques

Arbitration service CISAS has decided that T-Mobile's use of precognition in setting prices was cheating - allowing some customers to escape thir contracts - though in other cases CISAS has decided just the opposite.

The facts are that the mobile operator pushed up prices by 3.3 per cent, informing customers that this was within the government's Retail Price Increase and therefore allowed under their contracts. But when the letter was written, the RPI was only 3.2 per cent. T-Mobile guessed it would go up and that caused some punters to jump. It turns out the guess was accurate, but that's not good enough for CISAS, which has ruled that at least one customer is entitled to shrug off the contract.

CISAS is one of two UK arbitration bodies set up to deal with customer complaints. Communication providers are required to sign up to at least one of the schemes, which kick in only when the operator's own complaints procedure has reached deadlock, as it had in this case.

One unnamed customer posted the ruling onto a forum at Moneysaving Expert where malcontents have been gathering to marshal efforts against T-Mobile and its owner EE. The ruling clearly states that "neither party could have been aware of the RPI figure for March 2013 at the time the notice was given". So it is rather suprising that other complaints have been rejected by CISAS.

The arbitrator claims that every case is evaluated on its own merits, but given that so many people experienced the same thing one might imagine the same result would apply. Forum posters are now in deep discussions about what swayed the judgements and which particular adjucators are ruling which way, in the hope of finding patterns to help others.

T-Mobile was initially dismissive of complaints, claiming that it was confident the RPI would increase to 3.3 per cent and everything was legit as the new pricing wouldn't apply until after that happened. We've tried repeatedly to contact T-Mobile, since the CISAS ruling was published, but so far we've had no official response. ®

3 Big data security analytics techniques

More from The Register

next story
A black box for your SUITCASE: Now your lost luggage can phone home – quite literally
Breakfast in London, lunch in NYC, and your clothes in Peru
Broadband Secretary of SHEEP sensationally quits Cabinet
Maria Miller finally resigns over expenses row
Skype pimps pro-level broadcast service
Playing Cat and Mouse with the media
EE dismisses DATA-BURNING glitch with Orange Mail app
Bug quietly slurps PAYG credit - yet EE denies it exists
Like Google, Comcast might roll its own mobile voice network
Says anything's possible if regulators approve merger with Time Warner
Turnbull leaves Australia's broadband blackspots in the dark
New Statement of Expectations to NBN Co offers get-out clauses for blackspot builds
Facebook claims 100 MEEELLION active users in India
Who needs China when you've got the next billion in your sights?
Facebook splats in-app chat, whacks brats into crack yakety-yak app
Jibber-jabbering addicts turfed out just as Zuck warned
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a defence for mobile apps
In this whitepaper learn the various considerations for defending mobile applications; from the mobile application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies needed to properly assess mobile applications risk.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.