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Anons: We milked Norks dry of missile secrets, now we'll spaff it online

North Korea military uses computers? AS IF, sniff experts

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Shadowy hacking collective Anonymous has claimed it will leak a huge cache of confidential documents from North Korea's missile programme.

Although experts warned that the Norks were unlikely to store such sensitive data digitally, the hacktivists claimed to have purloined masses of secret military files. The Anons have vowed to publish the material on 25 June, the anniversary of the beginning of the Korean War.

In a statement, Anonymous hackers claimed they had opened a "ninja gateway" into Nork servers, allowing them to "hack their s**t", "liberate their data" as well as "win public opinion and support for the upcoming citizen's uprising".

Anonymous stated: "Previously we said we would penetrate the intranet and private networks of North Korea. And we were successful. We are not a threat to the world peace like your government. We do not forcing ourselves [sic] like your government. We will no longer abide by your ways of ruling, we work toward world peace and for the Republic of Korea. Oh good people of North Korea, it is time to wake up. Soon you will experience a new culture, and your worthless leadership will be recognised by everyone. Come and join us!"

The collective also attacked the poverty-stricken hermit nation - led by ridiculous boy-king Kim Jong-un - for pulling out of talks with the South. The Anons added: “You cannot destroy ideas with missiles. You end talks by placing the blame on the Republic of Korea. And the price of your error will be costly and placed upon you.”

Jason Healey, director of the Cyber Statecraft Initiative at the Atlantic Council, said he had doubts about whether Anonymous would have access to missile documents. He tweeted:

Anonymous targeted North Korea in April this year, hacking into a propaganda site called Uriminzokkiri and other Nork government sites. ®

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