Feeds

BT boss QUITS telecoms giant for front-bench gov job

Prime Minister poaches CEO - Gavin Patterson to take his place

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

Ian Livingston has quit the top job at BT, after being poached by Prime Minister David Cameron to take on a key trade and investment role for the government.

The surprise announcement that Livingston will leave the national telco in September comes at an extremely busy time for BT - which is currently rolling out its fibre network to much of the UK. The company's final third deployment to the harder-to-reach parts of the country is being propped up by government investment under the troubled Broadband Delivery UK scheme.

Despite the timing, the PM - whose Culture Secretary Maria Miller has come under fire for the handling of the BDUK project - clearly would prefer to see Livingston in Parliament.

He will take up a front-bench government position in the House of Lords in December as Minister of State for Trade and Investment, BT said.

Livingston's successor is Gavin Patterson, who is the the current boss of BT Retail - a wing of the business where sales for the company have been falling for successive quarters.

Prime Minister David Cameron arrives alongside BT CEO Ian Livingstone (right) at Adastral Park, BT's global innovation and development centre in Ipswich, Suffolk

Cameron and Livingston hanging out together

On his decision to leave the company, Livingston said:

I am honoured to have been asked by the Prime Minister to take on the role of Minister for Trade and Investment, with a remit of helping the growth of British companies and the country's future economic success. It has been an incredibly hard decision to leave BT at such an exciting time. However, the opportunities ahead and the strength of the management team that Gavin will lead mean that the company is in a great position.

I am immensely proud to have led this company over the last five years. We have made huge progress over the last few years but I know there is still so much more that BT can and will do.

Patterson joined the telecoms giant in 2004 and became a member of the board in 2008. He will start his new job as BT's CEO in September.

BT shares have fallen nearly 3 per cent on the London Stock Exchange immediately following the announcement. ®

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
Drag queens: Oh, don't be so bitchy, Facebook! Let us use our stage names
Handbags at dawn over free content ad network's ID policy
Blockbuster book lays out the first 20 years of the Smartphone Wars
Symbian's David Wood bares all. Not for the faint hearted
'Serious flaws in the Vertigan report' says broadband boffin
Report 'fails reality test' , is 'simply wrong' and offers ''convenient' justification for FTTN says Rod Tucker
This flashlight app requires: Your contacts list, identity, access to your camera...
Who us, dodgy? Vast majority of mobile apps fail privacy test
Apple Watch will CONQUER smartwatch world – analysts
After Applelocalypse, other wristputers will get stuck in
Shades of Mannesmann: Vodafone should buy T-Mobile US
Biting the bullet would let Blighty-based biz flip the bird at AT&T
Net neutrality fans' joy as '2.3 million email' flood hits US Congress
FCC invites opinions in CSV format, after Slowdown day 'success'
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile
Data demand and the rise of virtualization is challenging IT teams to deliver storage performance, scalability and capacity that can keep up, while maximizing efficiency.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.