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Anon posts Filipino president's phone numbers

Attempts to give Aquino a wake-up call and democracy a kick-start

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An Anonymous hacktivist has published what he claims to be three telephone numbers belonging to the Philippine president Benigno Simeon Cojuangco Aquino III, including his private mobile number, in a bid to urge voters to confront their leader directly.

Going by the pseudonym “#pR.is0n3r”, the hacker posted the numbers to his 10,000+ followers on Facebook on Friday night alongside the president’s home address and the address of Aquino’s office in the House of Representatives Batasan building.

Beneath the numbers is the message “This is now the chance for your voice to be heard”, alongside an Anonymous logo.

There was no confirmation as to the veracity of the phone numbers but an Aquino spokesman, Ricky Carandang, didn’t sound too happy.

"It's cyber vandalism plain and simple," he told AFP. "We're dealing with it. That's all I can say for now."

When the news wire tried to contact the numbers on Saturday morning they had apparently stopped working.

There was no further info on the Facebook page of #pR.is0n3r as to exactly how he obtained the numbers but in a message sent to local paper The Star, the hacktivist claimed he was “100 per cent” sure they were Aquino’s.

He also complained that the president was "very silent when it comes to national issues", adding, "We want to hear him."

Anonymous has had run-ins with the Acquino administration in the past, most notably in January when it defaced several government web sites in response to the Cybercrime Prevention Act 2012.

Local hacktivists claiming to be affiliated with the group have also been involved in a bitter online battle between Filipino and Malaysian hackers which erupted after bloody clashes in the northern Borneo region of Sabah, and in tit-for-tat exchanges with patriotic Chinese over the disputed group of rocks known as Scarborough Shoal. ®

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