Feeds

'Office Facebook' firm Tibbr wants you to PAY for mobe-meetings app

Great idea. Punters won't cough for it though

The essential guide to IT transformation

Tibbr, the social network designed for use at work, now integrates with online meetings for both mobile and desktop clients as it continues to argue that a social workplace is worth paying for.

The idea is to let Tibbr users throw together Google Hangouts, GoToMeeting sessions and Skype conference calls with a couple of clicks. It is also about making Tibbr the workplace home screen and justifying its place as one of the few social networks for which users are expected to pay.

The competition is Yammer, for which Microsoft paid $1.2bn a year ago and has been busy integrating into Office 365. Yammer is focused on messaging and microblogging, while Tibbr tries to recreate the Facebook experience with event groups, sharing of photos and files, exchanging pictures of cute cats and dissing each other's choice of hat – albeit only within the office and without adverts, all in exchange for a corporate-level fee.

30 per cent of Tibbr customers even host the content locally, on their own physical servers, which should keep the NSA at bay, but the rest use Amazon's cloud in the usual way.

Last month Tibbr re-launched its mobile apps, adding a Like button (in the form of a thumb) and the ability to process certain actions, such as approving expenses. The update integrates virtual meetings into the Tibbr experience – as long as they take place within a Google Hangout, a Skype call or a GoToMeeting session.

The problem for Tibbr, and anyone else planning to socialise the workplace, is user expectation – the experience, on mobile and desktop, has to compare to Facebook and LinkedIn.

Maintaining that user experience while extending Tibbr's capabilities into enterprise-level apps is an expensive process, which is why Tibbr is something that has to be paid for – or so we're told. ®

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

More from The Register

next story
The Return of BSOD: Does ANYONE trust Microsoft patches?
Sysadmins, you're either fighting fires or seen as incompetents now
China hopes home-grown OS will oust Microsoft
Doesn't much like Apple or Google, either
Linux turns 23 and Linus Torvalds celebrates as only he can
No, not with swearing, but by controlling the release cycle
This is how I set about making a fortune with my own startup
Would you leave your well-paid job to chase your dream?
Microsoft cries UNINSTALL in the wake of Blue Screens of Death™
Cache crash causes contained choloric calamity
Eat up Martha! Microsoft slings handwriting recog into OneNote on Android
Freehand input on non-Windows kit for the first time
Linux kernel devs made to finger their dongles before contributing code
Two-factor auth enabled for Kernel.org repositories
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
Top 8 considerations to enable and simplify mobility
In this whitepaper learn how to successfully add mobile capabilities simply and cost effectively.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?