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Reg readers tumesce as they get their tongues round 'podule'

'Podule, podule, podule. Oooh, now I feel dirty'

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Our recent coverage of Brit adventurer Nick Hancock's thwarted attempt to land on the Atlantic islet of Rockall has demonstrated a growing reader penchant for the word "podule".

Hancock had intended to spend 60 days atop the remote granite outcrop in a survival podule, and the mere mention of this splendid term prompted one commentard to note: "Podule is such a great word." He added: "Podule, podule."

Another splurged: "Podule podule podule podule podule," before admitting: "Now I feel dirty."

Well, there's no reason to feel ashamed. Podule is indeed an exciting term in the best tradition of quality English words beginning with "p", such as palaver, preposterous and pillock.

So, where does podule originate? We at El Reg have been using it for a while, and it's reasonable to assume it's simply a result of melding "pod" and "module". There may be hidden forces at work, however.

Our research into the matter shows there's a village in the Polish administrative district of district of Gmina Sedziejowice called Podule, which is undoubtedly small and round, and predates the first appearance of podule in the current sense.

Furthermore, we direct you to 1996 Telugu-language film Pavitra Bandham, which contains a fetching ditty entitled Pachha Bottu Cherigi Podule:

Watch Video

Note that the Telugu pronunciation of podule is roughly po-doo-lay, which doesn't have quite the same delicious ring to it, to be honest.

Whatever the truth about the true origins of podule, it looks to be a word with a bright future. Unsurprisingly, it's popped up in architecture, while it's been put to slighty more improbable service in spreading the Word of the Lord.

Good stuff, but there's one thing podule needs to truly rise to linguistic greatness: elevation to collective noun status. While we already enjoy a charm of finches, an unkindness of ravens and a right bunch of wankers, what's clearly lacking is a podule of something or other.

Over to you lot, then, to create the podule collective noun, which can join previous Vulture Central coinings including a venal of virgins and a fecund of fertility researchers. The comment thread awaits you below.

Now, if you'll excuse us, hmmmm, podule, podule, podule ... ®

And the IT angle here, exactly?

We're glad you asked us that. Try this for size.

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