Feeds

Raspberry Pi DUMBS DOWN to target world+dog

NOOBS tool simplifies setup process for non-techies

Security for virtualized datacentres

The Raspberry Pi was conceived of as a device so cheap that anyone could buy one, but also just raw enough that putting the computer to work would require users to learn a little about topics like installing operating systems and confronting BIOS settings.

It turns out that “put some people off” to the extent they shelved their Pis, according to the Pi Guys, as they've summoned a new tool called New Out Of Box Software (NOOBS) into existence so that getting a Pi up and running is much easier.

NOOBS comes as a .Zip file that, once unpacked to a SD card, will allow users to boot their Pi and chose from a list of operating systems they wish to run on the computer.

Importantly, this can all happen without network access on the Pi (downloading NOOBS on some other machine will need a network, of course).

NOOBS installs users' preferred OS onto the SD card and stays on that card so users can continue to access the graphical editor it offers for config.txt. The software also includes a browser so that once NOOBs is running users can reach a search engine and look for help beyond that which the package offers.

NOOBS has taken pride of place on the Pi's downloads page , where it is now the “recommended” download.

It's not hard to see the advent of NOOBs as a betrayal of the Pi's original raison d'être, inasmuch as it removes the need to learn how to acquire and install a Linux image and then removes the need for acquainting oneself with editing config.txt.

A kinder analysis could suggest that if those tasks are getting in the way of Pi buyers getting their computers running and getting their hands on Scratch to start programming, NOOBs is a good thing.

Over to you, Reg readers. Is this a dumbing down? A sell out? A sensible way to get even more people using Pis? Or something else entirely? Get thee to the comments field! ®

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

More from The Register

next story
Let it go, Steve: Ballmer bans iPads from his LA Clippers b-ball team
Can you imagine the scene? 'Hey guys, it's your new owner – WTF is that on your desk?'
How the FLAC do I tell MP3s from lossless audio?
Can you hear the difference? Can anyone?
iPAD-FONDLING fanboi sparks SECURITY ALERT at Sydney airport
Breaches screening rules cos Apple SCREEN ROOLZ, ok?
Apple's new iPhone 6 vulnerable to last year's TouchID fingerprint hack
But unsophisticated thieves need not attempt this trick
The British Museum plonks digital bricks on world of Minecraft
Institution confirms it's cool with joining the blocky universe
Turn OFF your phone or WE'LL ALL DI... live? Europe OKs mobes, tabs non-stop on flights
Airlines given green light to allow gate-to-gate jibber-jabber
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
Intelligent flash storage arrays
Tegile Intelligent Storage Arrays with IntelliFlash helps IT boost storage utilization and effciency while delivering unmatched storage savings and performance.
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.