Feeds

OpenStack head unworried by Dell, IBM, reversals

No public cloud from Dell? IBM loves CloudStack? No worries, says Alan Clark

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

Imagine for a moment that you head a large enterprise software effort and two major partners stiff you in quick succession.

First, one of those partners decides shut down a public cloud built on your software.

The second, despite public profession of mutual adoration and respect, buys a rival.

Now the reveal: the enterprise software in question is OpenStack, the first partner is Dell (which just canned its public cloud) and the second is IBM, which earlier this week hoovered up SoftLayer's CloudStack.

And the head of the enterprise software outfit? That'd be Alan Clark, chair of the OpenStack Foundation, who popped up in Sydney today to talk up the wares of his employer SUSE.

On Dell, Clark said the decision to step away from public cloud has everything to do with competition in that market and not any issues with OpenStack. The pair continue to work on private clouds together.

Clark was unaware of IBM's decision, an artefact of his Pacific-spanning efforts in the last 24 hours. He was again unflappable, saying his dealings with big blue lead him to believe its OpenStack efforts have only just begun. Deploying the slow-to-start-hard-to-stop oil tanker analogy, he said IBM has placed mighty engines at the stern of its OpenStack efforts and their power will generate impressive momentum.

Another source of momentum for OpenStack is China, which Clark said now accounts for the second-largest number of contributions to the stack if measured by nation-of-origin. To make it easier for those contributors to help out, the Foundation has chosen Hong Kong as the venue for its next Summit.

The specs of OpenStack's next iteration will be determined at that event, and Clark said he hopes “we have more companies and contributors” work on storage features for the software.

Clark also revealed that OpenStack's users predominantly report putting the stack to work in private clouds. A survey of the Foundation's user groups, while far from a census of all OpenStack usage, found 35 hosted private clouds, 15 hybrid clouds, 37 public clouds and 105 on-premises private clouds. Clark said he is “surprised” by the pace of adoption in the latter role, but that he doesn't feel that means OpenStack is a nascent VMware-or-Hyper-V-killer. Amazon Web Services, by contrast, was singled out as the vendor he felt is playing hard with its APIs and therefore perhaps playing to OpenStack's strong suit as users seek openness. ®

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
It's Big, it's Blue... it's simply FABLESS! IBM's chip-free future
Or why the reversal of globalisation ain't gonna 'appen
'Hmm, why CAN'T I run a water pipe through that rack of media servers?'
Leaving Las Vegas for Armenia kludging and Dubai dune bashing
Facebook slurps 'paste sites' for STOLEN passwords, sprinkles on hash and salt
Zuck's ad empire DOESN'T see details in plain text. Phew!
CAGE MATCH: Microsoft, Dell open co-located bit barns in Oz
Whole new species of XaaS spawning in the antipodes
Microsoft and Dell’s cloud in a box: Instant Azure for the data centre
A less painful way to run Microsoft’s private cloud
AWS pulls desktop-as-a-service from the PC
Support for PCoIP protocol means zero clients can run cloudy desktops
prev story

Whitepapers

Choosing cloud Backup services
Demystify how you can address your data protection needs in your small- to medium-sized business and select the best online backup service to meet your needs.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.