Feeds

MYSTERY Nokia image-mangling mobe spotted in public

Unique Finnish downsampling tech sees daylight

Security for virtualized datacentres

More images of Nokia's so-called EOS Windows smartphone have popped out on the web, and this time they show what looks like a final industrial design with a PureView-like camera.

Last year Nokia released a device with an unfeasibly large (for a phone) sensor that downsamples images, and is capable of knocking out outstanding photos. It's a technology unique to Nokia, and Nokia's been busy developing a Windows Phone version of the device - probably its best chance of turning good reviews into strong sales.

GSMArena, an anonymous Twitter account ('Vizileaks') and My Nokia Blog have all published images of a slimline device consistent with the design of the Lumia 920 and 925 phones, but with with an uncompromising camera bulge.

The leaked pic

The photos suggest that Qi-standard wireless charging will be available via a clip-on back plate, rather than built into the device itself.

The technology requires a custom graphics processor to handle the hefty throughput: 38 megapixels must be recorded, then downsampled and finally displayed – all without a lag to the user. The only instance of the technology on the market is Nokia's 808 PureView, running the Nokia Belle OS (aka Symbian).

This device took five years to develop, back when Nokia had far more control over its hardware then than it does now. Windows Phone licensees use a hardware reference design from Microsoft based on a Qualcomm board. That certainly speeds up development of generic devices, but makes a custom device such as this more difficult.

Nokia has one more summer media event planned, which may see the 'Real PureView' device released - although a Q4 release for the Windows version looks a safer bet likely, running Windows Phone 8.1. Rumours suggest two iterations of the phone will appear, the first with a "smaller" (but still industry-leading) 21MP sensor. This looks big enough to be the full Buster, however.

You can read your reporter's account of a few months spent with a PureView 808 here and a professional photographer's impressions of the 808 camera, here. ®

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

More from The Register

next story
How the FLAC do I tell MP3s from lossless audio?
Can you hear the difference? Can anyone?
iPAD-FONDLING fanboi sparks SECURITY ALERT at Sydney airport
Breaches screening rules cos Apple SCREEN ROOLZ, ok?
Apple's new iPhone 6 vulnerable to last year's TouchID fingerprint hack
But unsophisticated thieves need not attempt this trick
Crouching tiger, FAST ASLEEP dragon: Smugglers can't shift iPhone 6s
China's grey market reports 'sluggish' sales of Apple mobe
The British Museum plonks digital bricks on world of Minecraft
Institution confirms it's cool with joining the blocky universe
Turn OFF your phone or WE'LL ALL DI... live? Europe OKs mobes, tabs non-stop on flights
Airlines given green light to allow gate-to-gate jibber-jabber
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
Intelligent flash storage arrays
Tegile Intelligent Storage Arrays with IntelliFlash helps IT boost storage utilization and effciency while delivering unmatched storage savings and performance.
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.