Feeds

Boffins build gesture recognition using WiFi

'HELP! Every time I move, the lights go out!'

Securing Web Applications Made Simple and Scalable

Skip the sensors, skip the cameras: if you watch the signals closely enough, you can build gesture recognition using only WiFi signals.

That's what's just emerged from the University of Washington, where computer scientists say their WiSee technology can accurately recognise 94 percent of gestures from a sample of 900. They also say that the propagation behaviour of WiFi in normal households means the system would work even when the user is in a different room to the transmitter.

A hand gesture changes the TV channel using WiSee technology.

A hand gesture changes the TV channel using WiSee technology

It rests on the Doppler effect: if a signal bounces off a moving object, there'll be a small – very small! – change in its frequency, proportional to the velocity of the object. The shift is in the order of a handful of Hertz in a signal operating in the 5 GHz range, but if the receiver can identify the shift, it can make use of that information.

The UW researchers created a receiver with multiple antennas, each of which can lock onto different individuals, to prevent the system confusing different individuals. A specific recognition gesture activates the system, which the researchers would also hope can protect the system from being hijacked by an unauthorised user within reach of the WiFi system.

After that, the user can perform gestures to control whatever systems the WiSee is attached to – for example, to switch lights on and off in another room, or to adjust air-conditioning.

The researchers, Shyam Gollakota and Sidhant Gupta, have previously worked with Microsoft Research on gesture recognition using sound (SoundWave) and radiation from electrical wires (Humantenna). ®

Watch Video

HP ProLiant Gen8: Integrated lifecycle automation

More from The Register

next story
Malaysian Airlines flight MH17 claimed lives of HIV/AIDS cure scientists
Researchers, advocates, health workers among those on shot-down plane
The Sun took a day off last week and made NO sunspots
Someone needs to get that lazy star cooking again before things get cold around here
Mwa-ha-ha-ha! Eccentric billionaire Musk gets his PRIVATE SPACEPORT
In the Lone Star State, perhaps appropriately enough
MARS NEEDS OCEANS to support life - and so do exoplanets
Just being in the Goldilocks zone doesn't mean there'll be anyone to eat the porridge
Diary note: Pluto's close-up is a year from … now!
New Horizons is less than a year from the dwarf planet
Forty-five years ago: FOOTPRINTS FOUND ON MOON
NASA won't be back any time soon, sadly
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Prevent sensitive data leakage over insecure channels or stolen mobile devices.
The Essential Guide to IT Transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIO's automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise.
Mobile application security vulnerability report
The alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, and the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.