Feeds

Tech aristocracy joins conflab with Secret Rulers of the World

Annual Bilderberg meeting sets conspiracists' tongues wagging

High performance access to file storage

Some of the biggest names in the technology industry are among the guests at the 61st annual meeting of the Bilderberg Group – a secretive talking shop for the top echelons of business and politics or a shadowy cabal seeking to rule the world, depending on whom you believe.

Eric Schmidt, making his fourth trip, will represent Google as the group meets at the Grove Hotel in Watford, UK. Another old conference hand, Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos, will also be there. Craig Mundie, formerly Microsoft CTO and now Ballmer's special advisor, is on the guest list, as is PayPal-founder and Facebook-backer Peter Thiel and online activist Lawrence Lessig.

Technology issues are on the agenda, according to the organization's press release. Among the 12 topics for discussion over the three days of the conference: "How big data is changing almost everything", "Cyber warfare and the proliferation of asymmetric threats", and "Online education: promise and impacts".

Also on the 140-person guest list is the head of the International Monetary Fund Christine Lagarde, president of European Commission José Barroso, government bigwigs from across Europe and the US (including long-time attendee Henry Kissinger), the heads of financial, manufacturing, and media companies in the US and Europe, and a light smattering of journalists, all of whom have been sworn to secrecy.

Secret rulers of the world?

The Bilderberg Group takes its name from the hotel used for the first meeting back in 1954. The group was set up by European and US statesman as a confidential conference for the great and the good to discuss world issues candidly and openly.

The conference is hosted in a different venue each year in a quiet five-star hotel with good security and attached golfing facilities. Attendees are encouraged to speak their minds and are forbidden to discuss conversations in the conference with outsiders. This year's conference even has a no-fly zone set up over the hotel's grounds.

For years the group met behind closed doors and its existence wasn't mentioned in the mainstream media. But with the increase in information from internet communications, the news of the get-togethers got out and conspiracy groups got interested, not least because of the august attendee roll.

Former British professional footballer and now conspiracy-theory loon David Icke claims that Bilderbergers have created genetically-engineered blood lines of people to run the world as the captains of industry and use 3D projections to manipulate human perception and emotions. He also claims many are 12-foot, blood-drinking, shape-shifting lizards.

It has also been reported (correctly) that presidents Clinton, Bush the Second, and Obama all attended conferences before they were elected, as were British prime ministers Margaret Thatcher and Tony Blair.

This is taken by some as proof that the group picked them for their roles, but Bilderberg founder and British cabinet minister Dennis Healey said that invitations are simply issued to people who show potential.

In an interview with journalist Jon Ronson for the documentary "Secret Rulers of the World", Healey said that the group was set up to allow people at the top of their respective fields to discuss world issues, and while attendance does give the advantage of networking, it's not a sinister cabal set on world domination.

"To say we were striving for a one-world government is exaggerated, but not wholly unfair," he said. "Those of us in Bilderberg felt we couldn't go on forever fighting one another for nothing and killing people and rendering millions homeless. So we felt that a single community throughout the world would be a good thing." ®

High performance access to file storage

More from The Register

next story
Android engineer: We DIDN'T copy Apple OR follow Samsung's orders
Veep testifies for Samsung during Apple patent trial
One year on: diplomatic fail as Chinese APT gangs get back to work
Mandiant says past 12 months shows Beijing won't call off its hackers
Big Content goes after Kim Dotcom
Six studios sling sueballs at dead download destination
Alphadex fires back at British Gas with overcharging allegation
Brit colo outfit says it paid for 347KVA, has been charged for 1940KVA
Jack the RIPA: Blighty cops ignore law, retain innocents' comms data
Prime minister: Nothing to see here, go about your business
Singapore decides 'three strikes' laws are too intrusive
When even a prurient island nation thinks an idea is dodgy it has problems
Banks slap Olympus with £160 MEEELLION lawsuit
Scandal hit camera maker just can't shake off its past
France bans managers from contacting workers outside business hours
«Email? Mais non ... il est plus tard que six heures du soir!»
Reprieve for Weev: Court disowns AT&T hacker's conviction
Appeals court strikes down landmark sentence
US taxman blows Win XP deadline, must now spend millions on custom support
Gov't IT likened to 'a Model T with a lot of things on top of it'
prev story

Whitepapers

Mainstay ROI - Does application security pay?
In this whitepaper learn how you and your enterprise might benefit from better software security.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Mobile application security study
Download this report to see the alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, as well as the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.