Feeds

Indonesia to build crack IT-trained military unit to deflect attacks

Defence force needed to deal with growing online threat

Mobile application security vulnerability report

The world’s fourth most populous country, Indonesia, is fed up with getting hacked and wants to build a special military defence force to protect the state against online attacks.

A senior defence ministry official revealed that the government is proposing a new law which would allow such a force to defend against and disrupt the increasing number of attacks hurled at government systems, Xinhua reported.

Indonesia has some pretty strict penalties which can be levied against domestic hackers but nothing that would sanction the creation of a specialised military unit such as those which exist in the US and China.

The unit will apparently be manned by specially trained uniformed soldiers from the country’s army, navy and air force, with the Communication and Information ministry providing equipment and training.

Communications and Information minister Tifatul Sembiring said that the country has suffered over 36 million attacks in the past three years and is currently building out a National Cyber Security strategy to protect critical infrastructure and government assets.

It’s unclear how many of those attacks came from outside the country, but some of the most high profile over the past year or two have been the work of home-grown miscreants.

East Javan internet café worker Wildan Yani Ashari, 22, was arrested by police in January for defacing the homepage of president Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono (SBY) and could face up to 12 years in jail.

If and when the military defence unit finally is set up, let’s hope a name is chosen carefully – even a cursory search online will reveal the Indonesian Cyber Army is the moniker of a rather prolific hacking group, as well as the name of what appears to be an info-security training outfit. ®

Bridging the IT gap between rising business demands and ageing tools

More from The Register

next story
Arrr: Freetard-bothering Digital Economy Act tied up, thrown in the hold
Ministry of Fun confirms: Yes, we're busy doing nothing
ONE EMAIL costs mining company $300 MEEELION
Environmental activist walks free after hoax sent share price over a cliff
'Blow it up': Plods pop round for chat with Commonwealth Games tweeter
You'd better not be talking about the council's housing plans
Help yourself to anyone's photos FOR FREE, suggests UK.gov
Copyright law reforms will keep m'learned friends busy
Apple smacked with privacy sueball over Location Services
Class action launched on behalf of 100 million iPhone owners
UK government officially adopts Open Document Format
Microsoft insurgency fails, earns snarky remark from UK digital services head
You! Pirate! Stop pirating, or we shall admonish you politely. Repeatedly, if necessary
And we shall go about telling people you smell. No, not really
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Application security programs and practises
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Securing Web Applications Made Simple and Scalable
Learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.