Feeds

Australia's data breach notification law arrives at last

If you mess up, 'fess up ... or the Feds'll use some duress up in your face

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

Australian companies in control of personal information will soon have to notify the public if their systems are compromised or private data is leaked, under a bill introduced in federal parliament today.

Data breach notification has been under debate in this country for a couple of years, but the wheels of legislation have moved slowly (compared, for example, to parties agreeing to give themselves more electoral funding, something which manages to fly through parliament on the nod in ninety seconds or so).

Where organisations – or incidents – fall under the data breach notification proposals, they will have to notify individuals that a breach has occurred with a description of the breach, the kind of information compromised in the breach, and recommendations about the steps individuals should take in response to the breach.

Where individuals can't be notified, the bill states, a public announcement will be required.

The bill – the Privacy Amendment (Privacy Alerts) Bill 2013, here, gives the privacy commissioner scope to waive the need for notification or publication should there be a strong enough public interest case to do so.

On the other hand, someone trying to keep the lid on a breach could find themselves caught up by the other side of the act: the commissioner will also have the power to order disclosure by a company, particularly if a breach includes information such as personal information, credit reporting or eligibility information, tax file numbers and so on.

Would it surprise readers of Vulture South to learn that exemptions are being built into the legislation for law enforcement? We thought not. ®

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
MI6 oversight report on Lee Rigby murder: US web giants offer 'safe haven for TERRORISM'
PM urged to 'prioritise issue' after Facebook hindsight find
Assange™ slumps back on Ecuador's sofa after detention appeal binned
Swedish court rules there's 'great risk' WikiLeaker will dodge prosecution
NSA mass spying reform KILLED by US Senators
Democrats needed just TWO more votes to keep alive bill reining in some surveillance
'Internet Freedom Panel' to keep web overlord ICANN out of Russian hands – new proposal
Come back with our internet! cries Republican drawing up bill
prev story

Whitepapers

Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Designing and building an open ITOA architecture
Learn about a new IT data taxonomy defined by the four data sources of IT visibility: wire, machine, agent, and synthetic data sets.
How to determine if cloud backup is right for your servers
Two key factors, technical feasibility and TCO economics, that backup and IT operations managers should consider when assessing cloud backup.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?