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Symantec retires low-end security software

PC Tools' security wares won't make it into post-PC era, but PC-tuners safe

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

Symantec has quietly retired its PC Tools range of security products.

Acquired in 2008, PC Tools offered consumer-and-micro-business-grade anti-virus and network security tools dubbed “Spyware Doctor”, “Internet Security” and “Spyware Doctor with Antivirus”. Buying the Australian company that created the products gave Symantec a low-end brand to make its main Norton mark look posh.

That strategy seems now to be out of vogue, with Symantec saying PC Tools is now pining for the fjords “as we focus on streamlining our product range to provide fewer, better solutions for our customers.”

A “special offer” will herd encourage PC Tools users to adopt a Norton product. Those who wish to keep using PC Tools products will continue to receive updated virus signatures until their subscriptions expire.

While the three security products mentioned above are no more, PC Tools' “Registry Mechanic” and “Performance Toolkit” products live on.

Symantec's retirement announcement and FAQ for users can be found here. ®

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