Feeds

ASIO still secure, says government

China denies scooping plans for new Oz spook HQ

Gartner critical capabilities for enterprise endpoint backup

The Australian government has responded to accusations that its spy agency ASIO is vulnerable after building plans were apparently accessed when a contractor's network security was breached.

At the same time, communications vendor Codan has denied that its intellectual property has been compromised.

The accusations surfaced in the Australian Broadcasting Corporation's program Four Corners. As The Register reported yesterday, the documents compromised by attackers included floor plans, wiring diagrams, and server room locations.

The ASIO headquarters hasn't yet been completed, and is running behind time and over budget, leading to speculation that both the cost and delay are down to design changes to maintain security. The government has declined to respond to that speculation, but Attorney-General Mark Dreyfus insisted yesterday that the building remains secure.

The ABC now reports that Dreyfus told it “I conducted an inspection with the director-general of ASIO just last month, and I can assure everybody that this building is a very secure, state-of-the-art facility,” he said.

That report also states that the Chinese government denies any involvement in hacking.

A foreign ministry spokesman Hong Lei said the country opposes all forms of hacker attacks. “Though these reports seem solid, given that it is difficult to find the origin of such hacker attacks, I don't see where the real evidence is for reports like this.

“Groundless accusations will not help solve this issue,” Lei said.

Meanwhile, Codan, the communications supplier the program said had been compromised, has issued a statement to the Australian Securities Exchange stating that while it is a target of attempted intrusions of its networks, it “has no evidence that any intellectual property in either its metal detection or communications business has been obtained by unauthorised third parties”. ®

Gartner critical capabilities for enterprise endpoint backup

More from The Register

next story
'Stop dissing Google or quit': OK, I quit, says Code Club co-founder
And now a message from our sponsors: 'STFU or else'
Ex US cybersecurity czar guilty in child sex abuse website case
Health and Human Services IT security chief headed online to share vile images
Uber, Lyft and cutting corners: The true face of the Sharing Economy
Casual labour and tired ideas = not really web-tastic
Don't even THINK about copyright violation, says Indian state
Pre-emptive arrest for pirates in Karnataka
The police are WRONG: Watching YouTube videos is NOT illegal
And our man Corfield is pretty bloody cross about it
Oz biz regulator discovers shared servers in EPIC FACEPALM
'Not aware' that one IP can hold more than one Website
Apple tried to get a ban on Galaxy, judge said: NO, NO, NO
Judge Koh refuses Samsung ban for the third time
Pedals and wheel in that Google robo-car or it's off the road – Cali DMV
And insists on $5 million insurance per motor against accidents
prev story

Whitepapers

Top 10 endpoint backup mistakes
Avoid the ten endpoint backup mistakes to ensure that your critical corporate data is protected and end user productivity is improved.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Backing up distributed data
Eliminating the redundant use of bandwidth and storage capacity and application consolidation in the modern data center.
The essential guide to IT transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIOs automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.