Feeds

'Chinese hack' scoops plan to Oz spook HQ

Designer of new building breached before building completed

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

Australia is in the grip of a hacking scare, with its national broadcaster airing claims that Chinese attackers obtained copies of the plans for its new spooks' headquarters.

According to the Australian Broadcasting Corporation's Four Corners program, copies of plans for the Australian Security Intelligence Organisation's new headquarters were obtained via a third-party contractor. The $AU631 million “secret” building (that is, what's inside is secret, the building itself is too big to miss and its location, between Constitution Avenue and Parkes Way in Canberra, is public knowledge) is nearing the end of its long and budget blow-out-ridden construction process, and is due for completion late in 2013.

“What's inside” is, however, exactly what Four Corners says was copied by the attackers, with complete plans for the building – including floor plans, cabling plans, security systems and server room locations.

The identity of the contractor wasn't given by the program.

The program also “reveals” that other government departments and Australian companies have been targeted by attackers – which is like reading someone's palm and telling them they had a difficult time at age 13, since practically every business and government Internet connection in the world gets regular intrusion attempts.

ASIO's new headquarters

Plans copied by attackers: ASIO's new HQ in Canberra

More seriously, the program also alleges that designs for military radio systems have also been accessed, this time from an unnamed Australian-based manufacturer. Four Corners aired fears that this could compromise secret communications both in Australia and among its allies.

It also alleges breaches of undefined severity in the departments of Defence, Prime Minister and Cabinet, and Foreign Affairs and Trade. A breach might, however, mean anything from black-hats wandering through networks at will to someone carelessly clicking on the link and needing to get trojans cleaned from their machines. ®

The essential guide to IT transformation

More from The Register

next story
One HUNDRED FAMOUS LADIES exposed NUDE online
Celebrity women victimised as Apple iCloud accounts reportedly popped
Rubbish WPS config sees WiFi router keys popped in seconds
Another day, another way in to your home router
Goog says patch⁵⁰ your Chrome
64-bit browser loads cat vids FIFTEEN PERCENT faster!
NZ Justice Minister scalped as hacker leaks emails
Grab your popcorn: Subterfuge and slur disrupts election run up
HP: NORKS' cyber spying efforts actually a credible cyberthreat
'Sophisticated' spies, DIY tech and a TROLL ARMY – report
NIST to sysadmins: clean up your SSH mess
Too many keys, too badly managed
Scratched PC-dispatch patch patched, hatched in batch rematch
Windows security update fixed after triggering blue screens (and screams) of death
Attack flogged through shiny-clicky social media buttons
66,000 users popped by malicious Flash fudging add-on
New Snowden leak: How NSA shared 850-billion-plus metadata records
'Federated search' spaffed info all over Five Eyes chums
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?