Feeds

SAP in search of autistic software engineers who 'think different'

Pilot scheme goes global after team productivity boost

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

SAP wants to hire engineers diagnosed with autism - or people who "think differently" in the words of the enterprise software giant.

In a big push to fill out its ranks of developers, testers and bods involved in data quality assurance, SAP has turned to Specialisterne, a group dedicated to finding work for those with autism.

The global drive will last “several years”, starting in the US, Canada and Germany in 2013, SAP said. It follows a successful pilot programme between SAP Labs and Specialisterne in India where six people with autism were hired as software testers working on the corporate giant’s core Business Suite of applications.

“As a result, the team has increased their productivity and cohesiveness in key areas,” SAP said in a statement. A second pilot is planned for Ireland, with screening underway to fill five positions.

“We share a common belief that innovation comes from the ‘edges’. Only by employing people who think differently and spark innovation will SAP be prepared to handle the challenges of the 21st century,” said SAP human resources director Luisa Delgado.

Specialisterne called SAP its first global, multinational partner. “SAP [will] motivate the ecosystem to follow its example,” founder of Specialisterne and chairman of the board for the Specialist People Foundation Thorkil Sonne said in a statement.

According to the National Autistic Society, autism is a serious disorder* that affects people in many different ways; commonly, though, those diagnosed with autism can struggle when talking to or interacting with others. It affects more than 1 in 100 people in the UK, and only 15 per cent of adults with autism in Blighty are in full-time paid employment, we're told.

People with Asperger syndrome, a form of austism, are often of average or above average intelligence, the society noted. ®

* Some autistic individuals take exception to the characterisation of the condition as a "disorder" and are not particularly keen to join the ranks of the so-called "neurotypicals".

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

More from The Register

next story
Looking for a job in Europe? Experienced IT staff needed in UK, Italy and Germany
New graduates need life skills, says Euro Commish report
‘For the love of Pete, America, learn about decent chocolate’
If that's your only gripe about a life in LA, lucky you!
IT JOB OUTSOURCING: Will it ever END?
Let's look at the economics behind it...
The 'fun-nification' of computer education – good idea?
Compulsory code schools, luvvies love it, but what about Maths and Physics?
Want to break Netflix? It'll pay you to do the job
'Senior Chaos Engineer' sought to inflict all sorts of nasty, nasty, pain
HOT BABES! Worried you won't get that JOB in IT? MENTION how hot you are
'Don't hate me 'cos I'm beautiful' ploy for sad honeys
Oracle to DBAs: your certification is about to become worthless paper
So hurry up and get a new one, will all of you who took exams for 10g and lower?
prev story

Whitepapers

Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
New hybrid storage solutions
Tackling data challenges through emerging hybrid storage solutions that enable optimum database performance whilst managing costs and increasingly large data stores.
Security and trust: The backbone of doing business over the internet
Explores the current state of website security and the contributions Symantec is making to help organizations protect critical data and build trust with customers.