Feeds

Stand aside, Wi-Fi - these boffins are doing 40Gbps over the air

Wildly fast on the 240GHz band

High performance access to file storage

It won't make fibre-optic networking obsolete anytime soon, but it's still an impressive achievement: German researchers have demonstrated a one-kilometre point-to-point wireless transmission at 40Gbps.

The Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Solid State Physics and the Karlsruhe Institute for Technology researchers used 240GHz as the carrier for the high-speed data transfer – well out of the frequency range that you'd encounter in consumer-grade Wi-Fi kit.

According to Phys.org, project leader professor Ingmar Kallfass says the with data rates similar to fibre systems, the radio link his group has developed would integrate seamlessly with fibre systems. In a city context, he says, this could overcome rollout issues like the cost and delay encountered when trying to cross roads with new ducting (a very expensive process that doesn't just involve digging the hole; it also includes local government fees for road closure, traffic management staff charges and the like).

Operating in the 200-280GHz frequency range creates very small electronics, the group says, with a transmitter/receiver chip that measures just 4mm x 1.5mm. The frequency is also higher than that at which links typically suffer atmospheric effects like rain fade.

"This makes our radio link easier to install compared to free-space optical systems for data transmission. It also shows better robustness in poor weather conditions such as fog or rain", explains Jochen Antes of the Karlsruhe Institute for Technology.

tiny antenna in 240GHz range

The 4mm x 1.5mm wireless chip. Image: Sandra Iselin, Fraunhofer IAF

The high bit rate of the radio link, the researchers say, would allow the optical signal to directly feed a fibre link without requiring transcoding (or, even more complex, having to spread the fibre signal across multiple radio links).

"Improving the spectral efficiency by using more complex modulation formats or … multiplexing, will help to achieve even higher data rates", says Antes. ®

High performance access to file storage

More from The Register

next story
Seagate brings out 6TB HDD, did not need NO STEENKIN' SHINGLES
Or helium filling either, according to reports
European Court of Justice rips up Data Retention Directive
Rules 'interfering' measure to be 'invalid'
Dropbox defends fantastically badly timed Condoleezza Rice appointment
'Nothing is going to change with Dr. Rice's appointment,' file sharer promises
Cisco reps flog Whiptail's Invicta arrays against EMC and Pure
Storage reseller report reveals who's selling what
Bored with trading oil and gold? Why not flog some CLOUD servers?
Chicago Mercantile Exchange plans cloud spot exchange
Just what could be inside Dropbox's new 'Home For Life'?
Biz apps, messaging, photos, email, more storage – sorry, did you think there would be cake?
IT bods: How long does it take YOU to train up on new tech?
I'll leave my arrays to do the hard work, if you don't mind
prev story

Whitepapers

Mainstay ROI - Does application security pay?
In this whitepaper learn how you and your enterprise might benefit from better software security.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Mobile application security study
Download this report to see the alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, as well as the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.