Feeds

VMware taps ex-Ciscoer as channel chief

The channel is the key to Virtzilla's impending vCloud Hybrid Service

Protecting against web application threats using SSL

Just ahead of the formal launch of VMware's "Project Zephyr" vCloud Hybrid Service public cloud on Tuesday, the company has appointed a new channel chief. And the timing is not accidental, with VMware's channel being a key component of its hybrid cloud strategy.

It's easy to see why VMware wants to build its own public cloud based on the ESXi hypervisor and the vCloud extensions to its vCenter management console that turn it from virty infrastructure to an orchestrated cloud. The 220 service providers in the world that are part of the VMware Service Provider Program and that have built ESXi-compatible clouds are not competing effectively against Amazon Web Services.

If VMware wants to maintain that data center customer base that has 480,000 customers and their 36 million virtual machines, it has to build a public cloud that will allow customers to burst workloads out to it more seamlessly than the service providers have done to date.

In addition – and here's the key bit – all of the 55,000 channel partners that resell ESXi, vCloud, and other tools will be enabled to sell capacity on the vCloud Hybrid Service, and thus help VMware chase the $14bn opportunity it sees for supporting ESXi shops that want a slice of public cloud to go along with virtualized servers in their data centers.

To that end, VMware has just tapped Dave O'Callaghan to be senior vice president of global channels and alliances. That means O'Callaghan gets to herd the cats of solution providers, service providers, distributors, OEMs, system integrators, outsourcers, and independent software vendors who all want a piece of the VMware revenue stream.

O'Callaghan has been running his own consulting business for the past two years helping customers tweak their manufacturing, distribution, and reseller channels and has also been an adjunct professor at the Daniels College of Business at the University of Denver for the past five years. He spent a dozen years at Cisco Systems, most recently as vice president of its worldwide commercial sales and with a lengthy stint of nearly six years as head of Cisco's distribution channel and inventories.

In his three decades in the IT distribution racket, O'Callaghan spent 11 years as VP in charge of the western district for Hitachi Data Systems, which made both mainframes and disk arrays at that time. He also worked at Memorex Telex, which among many other things made mainframe-compatible disk and tape arrays back in the day. ®

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

More from The Register

next story
Wanna keep your data for 1,000 YEARS? No? Hard luck, HDS wants you to anyway
Combine Blu-ray and M-DISC and you get this monster
Google+ GOING, GOING ... ? Newbie Gmailers no longer forced into mandatory ID slurp
Mountain View distances itself from lame 'network thingy'
US boffins demo 'twisted radio' mux
OAM takes wireless signals to 32 Gbps
Apple flops out 2FA for iCloud in bid to stop future nude selfie leaks
Millions of 4chan users howl with laughter as Cupertino slams stable door
'Kim Kardashian snaps naked selfies with a BLACKBERRY'. *Twitterati gasps*
More alleged private, nude celeb pics appear online
Students playing with impressive racks? Yes, it's cluster comp time
The most comprehensive coverage the world has ever seen. Ever
Run little spreadsheet, run! IBM's Watson is coming to gobble you up
Big Blue's big super's big appetite for big data in big clouds for big analytics
Seagate's triple-headed Cerberus could SAVE the DISK WORLD
... and possibly bring us even more HAMR time. Yay!
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.