Feeds

Rolls-Royce climbs aboard Bloodhound SUPERSONIC car

Cash and tech support for mighty motor's mighty motor

High performance access to file storage

Rolls-Royce has announced it will back the Bloodhound SuperSonic Car (SSC), despite the company's "pretty robust policy about using our power plants in applications for which they were not designed".

Bloodhound will be partially powered by a Rolls-Royce EJ200 jet engine, normally found giving the Eurofighter-Typhoon a powerful kick up the backside. The team hopes the unit - in conjunction with the Falcon Hybrid Rocket - will enable pilot Andy Green to first break the current land speed record of 1,228km/h, and then hit 1,600km/h.*

Artist's impression of the Bloodhound SSC thundering along

Bloodhound SSC: Faster than the proverbial brown stuff off a shovel

Green is, along with project director Richard Noble and other "key personnel", a veteran of Thrust SSC, which in 1997 claimed the "first Supersonic World Land Speed Record". It's this experience which has prompted Rolls-Royce to climb aboard Bloodhound with "financial as well as technical support".

Colin Smith, Rolls-Royce's manufacturer's director of engineering and technology, told the BBC: "The reason we're prepared to relax this policy in this case is because Bloodhound is a professional organisation. I am impressed by Richard Noble's design process and his safety process, and he has a track record."

Bloodhound SSC has three EJ200 "development engines" available, courtesy of the Ministry of Defence. A couple are destined for the car itself, while the third will provide spare parts. Rolls-Royce has one clamped to a bench at its Bristol testbed facility, where Bloodhound boffins are making sure it'll interface properly with the car.

Illustration of the EJ200 engine. Pic: Bloodhound SSC

An EJ200 for your viewing pleasure

Mark Chapman, Bloodhound's chief engineer, explained: "The EJ200 was designed with one aircraft in mind - the Eurofighter-Typhoon. It lives within the Typhoon control system, so we've had to mimic a lot of the Typhoon inputs so that that engine still thinks it's in a Eurofighter."

The EJ200 will ultimately propel Bloodhound to around 560km/h, after which the Falcon Hybrid Rocket will kick in. Burning hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene solid fuel and high-test peroxide (HTP) oxidiser, the Falcon will produce 111kN during a 20-second burn.

The moment of truth will come next year at Hakskeen Pan dry lake bed in South Africa, when Andy Green fires up the beast in pursuit of his own record of 1,228km/h. ®

Bootnote

*A symbolic 1,000mph, for those of you who haven't yet got with the programme.

High performance access to file storage

More from The Register

next story
Elon Musk's LEAKY THRUSTER gas stalls Space Station supply run
Helium seeps from Falcon 9 first stage, delays new legs for NASA robonaut
Solar-powered aircraft unveiled for round-the-world flight
It's going to be a slow and sleepy flight for the pilots
Russian deputy PM: 'We are coming to the Moon FOREVER'
Plans to annex Earth's satellite with permanent base by 2030
LOHAN's Punch and Judy show relaunches Thursday
Weather looking good for second pop at test flights
Saturn spotted spawning new FEMTO-MOON
Icy 'Peggy' looks to be leaving the outer rings
Discovery time for 200m WONDER MATERIALS shaved from 4 MILLENNIA... to 4 years
Alloy, Alloy: Boffins in speed-classification breakthrough
India's GPS alternative launches second satellite
Closed satnav system due to have all seven birds aloft by 2016
Curiosity finds not-very-Australian-shaped rock on Mars
File under 'messianic pastries' and move on, people
Top Secret US payload launched into space successfully
Clandestine NRO spacecraft sets off on its unknown mission
prev story

Whitepapers

Mainstay ROI - Does application security pay?
In this whitepaper learn how you and your enterprise might benefit from better software security.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Mobile application security study
Download this report to see the alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, as well as the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.