Feeds

India's 2020 vision: a $10 BEELION software industry

Industry body wants PR

New hybrid storage solutions

India’s all-powerful IT body NASSCOM wants the country’s burgeoning software industry to generate $10bn in revenue by 2020, in a move designed to "rejuvenate" India’s sprawling IT industry.

The body’s newly unveiled 2020 plan will require India’s software market to grow its revenues almost five-fold from the estimated $2.2bn generated in 2013.

As part of its plans to turn the country’s software industry into a major world force, NASSCOM also launched a dedicated unit, the Product Council 2013-15, to oversee development.

“NASSCOM has been a transformational institution that has consistently evolved with the changing environment,” said chairman Krishnakumar Natarajan in a canned statement that imagines an Indian software industry selling "high value, innovative, next generation products which are enjoying robust sales traction and are establishing category / IP leadership in both domestic and international markets."

NASSCOM has actually been criticised in the past for failing to adapt quickly enough to an ever-changing IT industry.

Back in February, a group of 30 software companies joined together to form iSPIRT – a separate group designed to foster innovation and promote India as a global software hub.

Although NASSCOM at the time claimed this was not a breakaway group, some commentators claimed that the fact some members felt the need to create iSPIRT was symptomatic of an industry body that had become too bloated and preoccupied by the interests of its larger members like Infosys and TCS.

The new 2020 vision would seem to address these concerns and continue to drive the transformation of India’s vast IT industry towards a non-linear growth model by slowly transitioning from services to software.

It should be noted, though, that even by 2020, software will only contribute a small percentage of the whopping $300bn NASSCOM expects India's IT industries generate in aggregate revenues. ®

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

More from The Register

next story
Found inside ISIS terror chap's laptop: CELINE DION tunes
REPORT: Stash of terrorist material found in Syria Dell box
Show us your Five-Eyes SECRETS says Privacy International
Refusal to disclose GCHQ canteen menus and prices triggers Euro Human Rights Court action
Radio hams can encrypt, in emergencies, says Ofcom
Consultation promises new spectrum and hints at relaxed licence conditions
Heavy VPN users are probably pirates, says BBC
And ISPs should nab 'em on our behalf
Former Bitcoin Foundation chair pleads guilty to money-laundering charge
Charlie Shrem plea deal could still get him five YEARS in chokey
NORKS ban Wi-Fi and satellite internet at embassies
Crackdown on tardy diplomatic sysadmins providing accidental unfiltered internet access
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile
Data demand and the rise of virtualization is challenging IT teams to deliver storage performance, scalability and capacity that can keep up, while maximizing efficiency.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.