Feeds

Apple adds Galaxy S 4 to Samsung patent suit

Might as well kick Korean mobe-maker where it'll hurt most

The Essential Guide to IT Transformation

Apple has ratcheted-up its patent-infringment attack on Samsung, asking the US District Court of California to add Sammy's new smartphone flagship, the Galaxy S 4, to the list of products that Apple alleges violate its patents.

That handset was launched with hella hoopla this March (and reviewed by The Reg this Monday), and is the subject of an advertising blitz by the Korean electronics giant in an effort to knock the iPhone down a peg. Or two.

If you're having trouble following the myriad machinations in the Samsung-Apple patent war, you're not alone. Here's a brief overview – a full recounting would require many pages, and you do have more important things to do than read a rehash of the entire sordid story, eh?

Last August, a jury trial awarded Apple $1.05bn in damages, a figure that Apple asked to be tripled but was refused by the same judge who later trimmed those damages to under $600m.

In that case, Samsung had asked for a new trial, claiming that the foreman of the jury was tainted by desire for revenge against the Korean mobe-maker. The judge didn't buy that argument, but did hand Samsung a victory by denying Apple's request to ban the sale of some Samsung kit in the US.

That case is still under appeal, but it's a separate case from the one to which Apple has petitioned the court to add the Galaxy S 4.

The Galaxy S 4 is being added to Apple's second patent suit against Samsung – the one to which Cupertino added the Galaxy S III and the Galaxy Note last September, and which is scheduled to go to trial next Spring, after the appeals process for that first trial has been completed.

The judge in the second case – in which Samsung has countersued – told both parties to narrow the number of devices named in their complaints. Accordingly, in Apple's motion to add the Galaxy S 4 to the suit, their legal team wrote, "Upon the grant of such motion, Apple will eliminate (without prejudice) one of the Accused Products named herein, so that it will continue to accuse only 22 products of infringement at this stage of the litigation."

Even Apple, it appears, can sense when it's trying the patience of the court. ®

Boost IT visibility and business value

More from The Register

next story
Just TWO climate committee MPs contradict IPCC: The two with SCIENCE degrees
'Greenhouse effect is real, but as for the rest of it ...'
Adam Afriyie MP: Smart meters are NOT so smart
Mega-costly gas 'n' 'leccy totting-up tech not worth it - Tory MP
'Blow it up': Plods pop round for chat with Commonwealth Games tweeter
You'd better not be talking about the council's housing plans
Arrr: Freetard-bothering Digital Economy Act tied up, thrown in the hold
Ministry of Fun confirms: Yes, we're busy doing nothing
ONE EMAIL costs mining company $300 MEEELION
Environmental activist walks free after hoax sent share price over a cliff
Help yourself to anyone's photos FOR FREE, suggests UK.gov
Copyright law reforms will keep m'learned friends busy
Apple smacked with privacy sueball over Location Services
Class action launched on behalf of 100 million iPhone owners
UK government officially adopts Open Document Format
Microsoft insurgency fails, earns snarky remark from UK digital services head
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
The Essential Guide to IT Transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIO's automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.