Feeds

Boffins plan to drop €250,000 TEST-TUBE BURGER on London

Beefeaters, on your marks...

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

It's the mega-pricey cultured-meat slab without any of the grease, but would you wolf down a five-ounce lab-bred burger?

The world's most expensive piece of fast food - a meat patty made up of cultured meat that cost a massive €250,000 (£211,000, $325,000) to create - will soon be served in London.

Designed by a group of scientists at Maastricht University, led by professor of vascular physiology Dr Mark Post, the burger is made from in vitro muscle cells.

The number of burgers and the venue where they're to be eaten has yet to be confirmed. Post has insisted that the snack, upon which he has conducted "informal taste tests" will taste "reasonably good".

The burger is slightly bigger than a Burger King whopper or McDonalds Quarter Pounder, but there will be no gherkins or secret sauces used to garnish the pricey snack, just a bit of salt and pepper, says Post.

Anyone planning to save up for this beefy burger will probably be out of luck, as the lucky taster will be chosen by the project's main investor.

Post said the researchers hoped this project could cut back humanity's reliance on huge herds of methane-spewing cows.

He said: "I see the major hurdles, probably better than anybody else,” he said. “But you’ve got to have faith in technological advances, that they will be solved.

He added: “If we can reduce the global herd a millionfold, then I’m happy. I don’t need to reduce it a billionfold.

"I’m not by nature a very passionate guy. But I feel strongly that this could have a major impact on society in general. And that’s a big motivator.”

The meat was made using stem cells gathered from the neck of a slaughterhouse cow as it awaited its final moments. These were used to grow billions of muscle cells, which were used to create 20,000 strips of muscle.

At the time of writing, the price of gold was sitting at £1,429 (€1,101) per fine ounce, meaning that the development of the burger cost roughly the same as 227 fine ounces of gold (7kg) more than half the weight of a gold bar. ®

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
Are you a fat boy? Get to university NOW, you PENNILESS SLACKER
Rotund types paid nearly 20% less than people who didn't eat all the pies
Emma Watson should SHUT UP, all this abuse is HER OWN FAULT
... said an anon coward who we really wish hadn't posted on our website
Japan develops robot CHEERLEADERS which RIDE on BALLS
'Will put smiles on faces worldwide', predicts corporate PR chief
Bruges Booze tubes to pump LOVELY BEER underneath city
Belgian booze pumped from underground
Oz carrier Tiger Air takes terror alerts to new heights
Don't doodle, it might cost you your flight
Amazon: Wish in one hand, Twit in the other – see which one fills first
#AmazonWishList A year's supply of Arran scotch, ta
Let it go, Steve: Ballmer bans iPads from his LA Clippers b-ball team
Can you imagine the scene? 'Hey guys, it's your new owner – WTF is that on your desk?'
Oi, London thief. We KNOW what you're doing - our PRECRIME system warned us
Aye, shipmate, it be just like that Minority Report
prev story

Whitepapers

A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.