Feeds

'Hotmail, since you changed to Outlook, you've been a massive pr**k'

Plus: 'Pause and ask yourself: Where's the beef?'

HP ProLiant Gen8: Integrated lifecycle automation

Quotw This was the week when Nokia took some acrimonious advice from shareholders at the AGM, one of whom suggested the firm was on its way down to the pits of doom. Tired of the firm's direction and the absence of the much-promised turnaround, shareholder Hannu Virtanen told chief exec Stephen Elop:

You're a nice guy ... and the leadership team is doing its best, but clearly, it's not enough.

Are you aware that results are what matter? The road to hell is paved with good intentions. Please switch to another road.

Analysts, meanwhile, were no less unkind to Elop and also dismissive of the phone firm's partnership with Microsoft. Magnus Rehle, senior partner in Greenwich Consulting, said:

He's managed to decrease costs but not to increase market share.

Maybe they could go back to Google and say we also want to go with Android? Even if it hurts. Microsoft, they've had their chances, and are not managing to take off.

Microsoft finished up the migration of 300 million active Hotmail users to Outlook over the last week or so and is hoping that those who stuck with Hotmail all these years despite arguably better options for their mailing needs will "come to love" their new inboxes. However, there are already those who have articulately disagreed on Twitter:

Let me be honest with you Hotmail - ever since you changed to Outlook, you've been a massive prick.

And the firm has also been forced this week to backpedal furiously on its Windows 8 UI. "Key aspects" of the software would be changed, head of marketing and finance for Microsoft’s Windows group Tami Reller was forced to admit, saying:

We feel good that we've listened and looked at all of the customer feedback. We are being principled, not stubborn.

... Rather glossing over the fact that Redmond has been ignoring the cries of torment since the operating system first debuted and forced users to go "tablet" whether they wanted the desktop look or not. But she did admit:

It’s very clear we could and should have done more.

Meanwhile, tip-top Googler Eric Schmidt has suggested that what the internet really needs is a big ol' delete button. For the sake of folks' privacy, particularly kids who are going to be bitten on the ass by the junk they post online now, people need to be able to flush their presence offline, he said:

In America, there's a sense of fairness that's culturally true for all of us. The lack of a delete button on the internet is a significant issue. There is a time when erasure is a right thing.

In the storage world, HDS veep of product planning Michael Hay had this baffling, possibly coded message about what was coming soon from the firm:

So this week if you’re spellbound by a ringleader’s sizzling showmanship while he announces the latest hijinks of the Bourne clown troupe masquerading as a fire brigade to “save the storage world as we know it,” pause and ask: “Where’s the beef?” If you ask this question, and I believe you will, I have an answer for you and it is coming later this month.

He was referring to his company's Hitachi Virtual Storage Platform and Hitachi Unified Storage VM, and Bourne storage-maker EMC'S latest product, ViPR, though what he was talking about is another question entirely.

And finally, one judge in the US has clearly had enough of patent trolls like Prenda Law, which filed reams of suits against individuals it accused of downloading copyrighted X-rated movies in the hopes of getting them to cough up some cash or be outed as the kind of person who would torrent porn. In a Star Trek-reference-heavy ruling, US District Court judge Otis Wright said he had passed information about the firm along to various agencies for investigation.

He said:

Plaintiffs have outmaneuvered the legal system. They’ve discovered the nexus of antiquated copyright laws, paralyzing social stigma, and unaffordable defense costs. And they exploit this anomaly by accusing individuals of illegally downloading a single pornographic video. Then they offer to settle — for a sum calculated to be just below the cost of a bare-bones defense.

For these individuals, resistance is futile; most reluctantly pay rather than have their names associated with illegally downloading porn. So now, copyright laws originally designed to compensate starving artists allow starving attorneys in this electronic-media era to plunder the citizenry.

Wright also accused lawyers connected to Prenda Law of lies, fraud, forgery and ignoring court orders:

There is little doubt that Steele, Hansmeier, Duffy, Gibbs suffer from a form of moral turpitude unbecoming of an officer of the court. To this end, the Court will refer them to their respective state and federal bars.

And said that the porno troll's data would be passed along to other agencies:

Though Plaintiffs boldly probe the outskirts of law, the only enterprise they resemble is RICO (Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act).

The federal agency 11 decks up is familiar with their prime directive and will gladly refit them for their next voyage.

The Court will refer this matter to the United States Attorney for the Central District of California. It will also refer this matter to the Criminal Investigation Division of the Internal Revenue Service and will notify all judges before whom these attorneys have pending cases. ®

Reducing security risks from open source software

More from The Register

next story
Sysadmin Day 2014: Quick, there's still time to get the beers in
He walked over the broken glass, killed the thugs... and er... reconnected the cables*
SHOCK and AWS: The fall of Amazon's deflationary cloud
Just as Jeff Bezos did to books and CDs, Amazon's rivals are now doing to it
Amazon Reveals One Weird Trick: A Loss On Almost $20bn In Sales
Investors really hate it: Share price plunge as growth SLOWS in key AWS division
US judge: YES, cops or feds so can slurp an ENTIRE Gmail account
Crooks don't have folders labelled 'drug records', opines NY beak
Auntie remains MYSTIFIED by that weekend BBC iPlayer and website outage
Still doing 'forensics' on the caching layer – Beeb digi wonk
BlackBerry: Toss the server, mate... BES is in the CLOUD now
BlackBerry Enterprise Services takes aim at SMEs - but there's a catch
The triumph of VVOL: Everyone's jumping into bed with VMware
'Bandwagon'? Yes, we're on it and so what, say big dogs
Carbon tax repeal won't see data centre operators cut prices
Rackspace says electricity isn't a major cost, Equinix promises 'no levy'
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Top 8 considerations to enable and simplify mobility
In this whitepaper learn how to successfully add mobile capabilities simply and cost effectively.
Seven Steps to Software Security
Seven practical steps you can begin to take today to secure your applications and prevent the damages a successful cyber-attack can cause.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.