Feeds

Obama orders gov data must be 'open and machine-readable'

Get busy, US government IT folk, you've got six months to show progress

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

US President Barack Obama has issued an Executive Order, decreeing that “Government information shall be managed as an asset throughout its life cycle to promote interoperability and openness, and, wherever possible and legally permissible, to ensure that data are released to the public in ways that make the data easy to find, accessible, and usable.”

The Order notes that in recent years the US government made GPS available to all and then created data.gov.

“Entrepreneurs and innovators have continued to develop a vast range of useful new products and businesses using these public information resources, creating good jobs in the process,” the Order says, making it plain more jobs and innovation are the desired outcome of this initiative.

The Order calls for the penning of a formal Open Data Policy that agencies must implement. Thirty days after that document lands, “an open online repository of tools and best practices to assist agencies in integrating the Open Data Policy into their operations in furtherance of their missions” is due to land. Another three months down the track authorities must “identify and initiate implementation of measures to support the integration of the Open Data Policy requirements into Federal acquisition and grant-making processes.”

Government agencies will eventually have to implement the policy.

All of which will delight many, save perhaps for the requirement for agencies to conduct “a full analysis of privacy, confidentiality, and security risks into each stage of the information lifecycle to identify information that should not be released.”

Might some read that requirement and wonder if a list of material held back under that provision is more interesting than the data that is released? With the policy as-yet-unwritten it's impossible to say how much information will be available about absent information, or whether appeals are possible.

Such processes may become desirable, as the Executive Order applies to independent agencies, of class of organisation into which the Central Intelligence Agency falls. So does NASA, which should make things interesting for Area 51 conspiracists and all manner of other folks best dealt with by Snopes.com. ®

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
Facebook pays INFINITELY MORE UK corp tax than in 2012
Thanks for the £3k, Zuck. Doh! you're IN CREDIT. Guess not
Facebook, Apple: LADIES! Why not FREEZE your EGGS? It's on the company!
No biological clockwatching when you work in Silicon Valley
Happiness economics is bollocks. Oh, UK.gov just adopted it? Er ...
Opportunity doesn't knock; it costs us instead
Sysadmin with EBOLA? Gartner's issued advice to debug your biz
Start hoarding cleaning supplies, analyst firm says, and assume your team will scatter
YARR! Pirates walk the plank: DMCA magnets sink in Google results
Spaffing copyrighted stuff over the web? No search ranking for you
Don't bother telling people if you lose their data, say Euro bods
You read that right – with the proviso that it's encrypted
Apple SILENCES Bose, YANKS headphones from stores
The, er, Beats go on after noise-cancelling spat
prev story

Whitepapers

Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.