Feeds

Yes! It's the NFC phone-bonk doorbell app AT LAST

Knock? Use your phone to call? NO, SCAN the TAG damn you

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

Home owners too lazy to answer the doorbell can relax as the latest innovation from Doorbl puts visitors in touch via a smartphone tapped to the door.

The app, available for Android and iOS, links a Near Field Communication tag to a cloud service which lets one know when a visitor is on the doorstep. This assumes the visitor has a smartphone with NFC and a working data connection, with coverage, and is prepared to combine these facilities, rather than just knocking on the door with the Mk.1 knuckle.

The humble doorbell might be considered a UX design classic. Wireless connectivity might be all the rage these days, as drilling holes is harder with modern doorframes turning plastic, but the basic single-button interface remains something with which most people are familiar.

Doorbl doesn't exclusively rely on NFC. Visitors can instead scan a QR Code sticker affixed to the frame (stop laughing at the back), but they'll still need a smartphone. The home owner needs the app installed to receive the pushed messages, and can then call the visitor back: assuming said visitor has filled in the online form with their mobile number.

NFC World spoke to Roy Solberg who developed the app, apparently because his girlfriend couldn't get to the door in time and wanted to send visitors a "please wait" message. One has to wonder if such impatient visitors are going to bother filling in their phone number on the doorstep.

Should they not bother, having decided that digging out their phone, scanning the QR Code and waiting for a data connection is, frankly, too much to bother with, then our home owner will just have to open the door to find out who's there - or shout. Shouting often works, in Vulture Central's experience.

There are alternatives. Various camera systems can offer the homeowner a view of the visitor, and the rather-more-subtle Smartbel will call one's mobile while pretending to be an intercom system, so one's visitor believes one is at home but too impolite or lazy to bother coming to the door.

But those cost money, (a hundred quid for Smartbel, or even more for battery-operated Wi-Fi doorbell Doorbot), while Doorbl is free if one tolerates the adverts. Doorbl has the added advantage of ensuring one is never at home when poor people (who lack smartphones) come calling. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
Of COURSE Stephen Elop's to blame for Nokia woes, says author
'Google did have some unique propositions for Nokia'
FCC, Google cast eye over millimetre wireless
The smaller the wave, the bigger 5G's chances of success
It's even GRIMMER up North after MEGA SKY BROADBAND OUTAGE
By 'eck! Eccles cake production thrown into jeopardy
Mobile coverage on trains really is pants
You thought it was just *insert your provider here*, but now we have numbers
Don't mess with Texas ('cos it's getting Google Fiber and you're not)
A bit late, but company says 1Gbps Austin network almost ready to compete with AT&T
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.