Feeds

German court: 'Nein' to Apple 'global consent' on fanbois' privacy

Keine Weltexposition von Privatendaten, chum

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

A German court has demanded that Apple change its rules on handling sensitive customer data.

The Berlin Regional Court told Apple to change eight clauses in its privacy policy, after the fruity firm agreed to drop a further seven of them.

These clauses include an end to "global consent" to use of customer data - which means that Apple users willingly submit their personal data to Cupertino without necessarily being informed about when and why Apple would use it. Following this judgment, Cupertino can no longer assume that German users agree to all their terms and conditions.

The changes will only apply to German users, meaning that British fanbois will still face the full mass of Cupertino's blitzkrieg against privacy.

A campaign group called Verbraucherzentrale Bundesverband (VZBV), or the Federation of German Consumer Associations, brought the case against Apple. In a statement on its website, which we've run through Google Translate, the VZBV said the court had "strengthened the rights of privacy of Apple's customers in Germany".

Gerd Billen, executive director of the VZBV, said:

The verdict shows the importance of privacy for consumers in the digital world.

Apple expects "global consent" from its customers. This is in breach of German law which requires that consumers know exactly what their data is being used for and how it is harvested. According to the ruling, the regulations unduly disadvantaged consumers because they violated fundamental principles of the German data protection law.

In addition, Apple will no longer be allowed to collect precise location data from German users, which is used to offer location-sensitive services, products or advertising. Even though location stats are collected without identifying data, the court prohibited the practice.

It will no longer be able to harvest data from users' contacts or merge information about a customer with information collected by its affiliates. Neither will the fruity firm be allowed to collect addresses, phone numbers or emails of consumers without said user's express permission.

Cupertino will, therefore, have to be more specific about how it uses German users' data from now on.

Apple will be able to appeal against the decision, which it is likely to do. If the appeal fails, Apple will be compelled to make all the required changes to its privacy policy. ®

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

More from The Register

next story
Just don't blame Bono! Apple iTunes music sales PLUMMET
Cupertino revenue hit by cheapo downloads, says report
The DRUGSTORES DON'T WORK, CVS makes IT WORSE ... for Apple Pay
Goog Wallet apparently also spurned in NFC lockdown
Hey - who wants 4.8 TERABYTES almost AS FAST AS MEMORY?
China's Memblaze says they've got it in PCIe. Yow
Cray-cray Met Office spaffs £97m on VERY AVERAGE HPC box
Only 250th most powerful in the world? Bring back Michael Fish
Microsoft brings the CLOUD that GOES ON FOREVER
Sky's the limit with unrestricted space in the cloud
'ANYTHING BUT STABLE' Netflix suffers BIG Europe-wide outage
Friday night LIVE? Nope. The only thing streaming are tears down my face
IBM, backing away from hardware? NEVER!
Don't be so sure, so-surers
Google roolz! Nest buys Revolv, KILLS new sales of home hub
Take my temperature, I'm feeling a little bit dizzy
prev story

Whitepapers

Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
Getting started with customer-focused identity management
Learn why identity is a fundamental requirement to digital growth, and how without it there is no way to identify and engage customers in a meaningful way.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
Protecting against web application threats using SSL
SSL encryption can protect server‐to‐server communications, client devices, cloud resources, and other endpoints in order to help prevent the risk of data loss and losing customer trust.